The Third Time Is Definitely The Charm. Or Is It?

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They say good things come in three’s. I can think of the following things that come in three’s (to prove my point), Three Ring Circus, Three Little Pigs, Three Blind Mice, Three Stooges and so much more.

Tekin has recently released their third generation of their Redline brushless motor appropriately called Redline Gen 3. Tekin_Redline_Gen3_17This generation applies to their entire lineup. However, I am only going to review the 17.5 RPM version at this time.

Let’s dig into the Redline Gen 3 and see if it is really new from the ground up as they claim. Just looking at the motor itself you can visually see that it is different. However, I have seen motors get a new coat of paint and some fancy stickers and be claimed new from the ground up.

One of the first things that I do, other than a visual inspection, is to spin the rotor. I do this for a couple of reasons. One is that I make sure that nothing made its way inside the motor and caused it to lock up.

Gen 3 Rotor to Sensor Board Spacing.

Gen 3 Rotor to Sensor Board Spacing.

The second reason is to check the spacing of the rotor as it comes from the manufacturer. From what I could tell, the rotor was spaced correctly inside the motor. What I mean by that is the rotor will not rub on the sensor board but it isn’t too far away from the sensor board that would cause issues.

I have to say, taking this motor apart has to be one of the easiest things I have done in a while. I removed the three screws on the bottom of the motor, opposite end of the sensor board, and it slide right off the motor shaft.

All of the pieces that make up the Tekin Redline Gen3.

All of the pieces that make up the Tekin Redline Gen3.

Three more screws on the sensor side and I now have the other end of the motor disassembled. If I had a need to remove the sensor board, it is held in place by three screws but I had no need to remove it so I left that attached.

Now that I am looking at this motor, which is apart, on my bench I have a concern that will only apply in a specific situation. I like to travel to larger events where we bring our own motors and we have to present them to tech for inspection. They do a number of things to the motor but after technical inspection they usually seal the motor by putting something on the screws so they can quickly tell if a motor has been tampered with after inspection. Well…in order to take the motor apart I remove the same three screws that I use to adjust the timing.

Three screws to disassemble and adjust timing.

Three screws to disassemble and adjust timing.

So if I want to adjust the timing of the motor I will be tampering with the screws, if they are marked. Being the honest person that I am I would take the motor back to tech and have them watch me loosen the screws, adjust the timing and have them seal the screws again.

While this isn’t an ideal situation, it is something that you will have to plan out in advance. Set the timing of the motor where you want it when you reassemble the motor so you don’t have to go back through the technical procedure again. I think the tech guys would appreciate it.

Ok, so I have one concern with the construction of the motor but that only applies in specific situations. That situation would not apply to 90%, if not higher, of us. However, if the situation does come up be sure you have a plan to mitigate the situation. Besides, I most likely would have run the motor in the past or on the track before I submit it for technical inspection and I don’t see myself changing the timing unless I made a huge mistake. Since most local tracks don’t have this type of rule, it isn’t that big of deal to most of us.

Let’s get to the specifics of the motor shall we. As I mentioned earlier, I have the 17.5 RPM version of the motor and the stator measured at 19.4mm. In my eyes, anything below a 20mm stator measurement is considered a short stack motor and therefore I would consider this a short stack motor. Remember, ROAR has a rule that no stator can measure less than 19.3mm so we are good. Since I am still talking about the Stator, resistance measurement readings are all within .2 of each other. Either I am getting lucky and picking good motors or the manufacturing processes have improved for all motors that I have tested.

The rotor itself measured out at 12.45mm. The allowable tolerance on this particular item has a maximum size of 12.51mm.

Drill balanced rotor.

Drill balanced rotor.

So you can see it is well below the allowable maximum size. Now what I have found is that rotors the size of 12.5mm produce more torque and less rpm than one that measure less than 12.5. So at 12.45mm this should help increase the RPM of the motor without a significant reduction in torque. In addition, due to the size difference, I also believe that the magnetic strength is less with the smaller rotor because there is less material. So with that said, my rotor measured out at a – 1451 and a +1462. These numbers are still respectable in my book and from what I have been told, Tekin will be releasing optional rotors for the motor to allow you to tune the motor for most, if not all, track or backyard conditions.

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 35 Degree Timing

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 35 Degree Timing

The sensor board was pretty darn good on this particular motor. Using my G-Force meter I found a max difference of two degrees across the three sensors. In addition, the timing marks on the can align pretty close if not right on to what I measured with the G-Force meter. The timing marks are numbered in even numbers, e.g. 20, 40, 60. The odd numbers such as 30, 50 are identified with little marks which are easy to read.

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 40 Degree Timing

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 40 Degree Timing

I decided to bolt this motor into a 2wd buggy as I didn’t have anything lighter to run it in. They say you can use it in a touring car and 1/12th scale as well. So if you were running motor that was more torque based and installed this motor you will have to drop a few teeth on the pinion gear. Remember, this motor has more RPM and when you have more RPM you lose some torque. It would be nice to have both but we will take what this motor produces because the numbers are very respectable.

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 45 Degree Timing

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 40 Degree Timing

Ok enough of the lecture; let’s talk about how the motor ran. As I mentioned, I installed it in my 2wd buggy and ran it on a fairly small track with a bunch of 180 degree turns. I was surprised that after adjusting the timing down a little bit from the factory setting I was able to find the right gear for the motor and the track pretty quickly with minimal heat buildup. I attribute this to the fact that the can itself has vent holes of the right size and in the right location. Eventually I will be able to get this motor out on a more flowing track and I think it will really start to show what it can do. For now, I don’t think I was at a disadvantage on a tight 180 degree turn style of track in a 2wd buggy.

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 50 Degree Timing

Tekin Gen3 RPM Version 50 Degree Timing

To summarize, I believe the Gen 3 to be the best motor that Tekin has released to date. The motors themselves are well designed, manufactured, and assembled.  They have many different flavors, i.e. turns, to choose from. You have the choice of an RPM version and a Standard version in some winds and different rotors are available to accommodate whatever your conditions are. I can say that this motor is new and does not just have that fresh coat of paint and new stickers. Overall, I am happy with my purchase. Now, I just need to talk the wife into letting me get another car to run this motor in…oh honey…I need…

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