Thread: Tamiya FF04
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Old 05-06-2017, 12:35 AM  
fyrstormer
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Originally Posted by Tom1977 View Post
I pulled the trigger now on the black one. Maybe the last NIB-Kit in Europe.

I will use it on track, but just for fun cause we have no official FF-class in Germany. It's my first FF-car and i'm very courious how it will handle. The FF04Evo will have a nice place beside my TRF419x and Evo6 MS.
It definitely handles differently; very stable when accelerating and braking, though it will skid in a straight line if you brake too hard, and you can't accelerate as hard as you could with a 4WD car. Laser-sharp steering with a tendency to oversteer because there's no power at the rear to push the chassis in a straight line when cornering. It's the pleasant sort of different, though, whereas RWD is much more frustrating unless you have tons of downforce and minimal need for braking, as is the case with F1 cars. Due to the limited grip available for accelerating, I recommend a low-power motor with very high gearing; since you'll be running it on a track, you can leave the gear cover uninstalled to allow a wider range of gearing options. If you're not a racing purist, you can install the XV-01 slipper clutch to help reduce wheelspin when accelerating, though that will limit your spur gear options and make gearing-up more difficult.

As v_squared mentioned, a very stiff front diff is helpful, since diffing-out wastes much more power when there's only two drive wheels. (on RWD diffing-out is still necessary to maintain stability, but on FWD it has no significant benefits.) I actually ran a spool in the front for a while, but as the drive cups started to wear, the extra slop caused the car to exhibit one-wheel-drive tendencies, and it would wander when going in a straight line. I replaced the spool with a diff filled with 200K oil, to allow just enough diff action to ensure both drive cups are engaged against the axle dogbones at all times, and that fixed the wandering issue. I still have front spools in several other cars, but they're all 4WD with rear weight biases, so they have different needs to begin with.
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