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Old 12-23-2009, 01:46 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by Imbuter2000 View Post
Ok, this explanation reassures me, thanks Marine!

New question: why do you write "too much" solder in those examples in your drawing?
I thought that "too much" were only when it's too much between the post and the wire, but in the case of your two examples it's seem to me to have only the effect of fortifying the result. Am I wrong?
I'm glad to help.

Too much solder... More solder is not better for the connection, it does not make it stronger or electrically superior. Having too much solder can hide bad solder flow problems, is can also weaken the connection by having extra solder flowing into the un-stripped section of wire, making it break easier. Its best to use just enough solder to make a connection, it has less resistance and holds up better.

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its a cheap one that I keep in my track bag....
Well if you can not get it out with some pliers with the iron on high, you may need a new one.

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Originally Posted by Imbuter2000 View Post
I read on the page of "W.S. Deans Racing Silver Solder 1 oz." on Towerhobbies' site that "Silver or Gold plating requires a special solder. Ordinary solder causes a chemical reaction which will degrade the joint. Deans Racing Solder is 2% silver with high activity ProFlux. [...] The Best Solder for Silver and Gold Plated Surfaces."

Marketing or truth?
Yes, gold dissolves and reacts to tin and lead. Silver has issues as well. The joints are far less strong than they should be.

But the issue is not a big problem because gold and silver plated electrical components are designed to be used in mechanical/contact type connections like plugs and bullet connections. This is because gold and silver do not corrode as easily, and the addition of electricity and two types of metals causes a lot of corrosion, the gold plating stops/slows that process. Any normal part designed for solder will not be gold plated. (at least the solder tab area) So don't worry about that, Gold and silver plated parts cost a lot more than normal ones, a set of deans plugs would cost near $10 instead of $4.

Silver solder is harder to use and is actually more poisonous than lead solder. To me, unless it is absolutely needed, its benifits are not worth its problems.

It also has a higher acidic flux, with is harsher on components and iron tips, meaning it is even more important to clean up after. In the real world, there is no such thing as No-clean flux.
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Old 12-23-2009, 03:17 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by marine6680 View Post
Too much solder... More solder is not better for the connection, it does not make it stronger or electrically superior. Having too much solder can hide bad solder flow problems, is can also weaken the connection by having extra solder flowing into the un-stripped section of wire, making it break easier. Its best to use just enough solder to make a connection, it has less resistance and holds up better.
Look at this new drawing: img707.imageshack.us/img707/5607/screenshotfg.jpg
Can we say that, once we obtained a successfully result like that on the left, adding solder to reach the result on the right adds mechanical resistence without decreasing electric resistence?

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Originally Posted by marine6680 View Post
Gold and silver plated parts
The question is: is Sn63Pb37 + RMA flux the best for gold and silver plated parts too?

By the way, I notice that some RC wires appears externally grey instead of reddish like copper. Why? what material are they done of?

Last edited by Imbuter2000; 12-23-2009 at 04:23 PM.
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Old 12-23-2009, 05:25 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by Imbuter2000 View Post
Look at this new drawing: img707.imageshack.us/img707/5607/screenshotfg.jpg
Can we say that, once we obtained a successfully result like that on the left, adding solder to reach the result on the right adds mechanical resistence without decreasing electric resistence?

The question is: is Sn63Pb37 + RMA flux the best for gold and silver plated parts too?

By the way, I notice that some RC wires appears externally grey instead of reddish like copper. Why? what material are they done of?
No, that would not actually add any benefit. While, if the solder is flowing well, it would not be very bad, it is not better. So, if you get a little too much solder on the connection, there is no need to overly worry, it just is not needed. The standards for soldering have been developed for as long as soldering electronics has existed. It has been poked, prodded, and even x-rayed, to figure out the best combination of strength, resistance and reliability. The standards I was taught to use are for aviation and spaceflight, they are the toughest and strictest standards around, and the most reliable. While such strict standards are not needed in RC, striving to reach them is never a bad thing. So long as your connections are smooth you will be fine. The techniques I provided will help even novice solderers make reliable connections, even if they are not perfect.

No, lead solder is not ideal for gold or silver plated parts, but silver solder also has tin in it, and that is not good for plated parts as well. True gold/silver safe solders are not readily available and are harder to use and need higher heat. But like I said, plated parts are usually not designed for soldering. The parts that are plated are the parts designed for physical contact connections, like CPU sockets and PC board connections or High end audio/visual plugs. Deans plugs are not gold plated, or they are not listed as such. I will check up on that and the traxxas connectors. If they are, I would suspect that they are not plated at the solder area.

The thin plating on the connectors would not really cause much problems though. It takes a 5% concentration of gold in the solder to negatively impact the connection to any real degree. There is not all that much gold in the plating.

Some wire is coated in tin or other metal for corrosion resistance. Some is even silver coated, but that type is costly, and needs special solder or crimp type connections. Since the special solders are hard to get and use, and crimp type connectors are rare in RC the use of the silver coated wire is not needed or its benefits are negated by the use of improper solders and connectors.

Last edited by marine6680; 12-23-2009 at 05:36 PM.
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Old 12-23-2009, 07:54 PM   #64
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I don't know about anyone else, but I would love to see you put a video on youtube!!! Please.
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Old 12-24-2009, 10:08 AM   #65
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I don't know about anyone else, but I would love to see you put a video on youtube!!! Please.
I will when I can, my Iron is burn out so I need a replacement. With the holidays its been low on the list of things to spend on.
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Old 12-25-2009, 08:31 AM   #66
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Marine,
Any advice on soldering the tabs of Li-Poly batteries. I'm not sure what the tabs are made of but soldering them sux.
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Old 12-25-2009, 09:13 AM   #67
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Unless they are copper tabs, you'll need zinc solder and a compatible zinc based flux and its corrosive. Be careful, the fumes are said to be toxic.
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Old 12-25-2009, 08:19 PM   #68
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More solder does not make things better. If you are running on brushless modified motor.. Excess solder will melt causing short to motor & ESC. The wiring to the motor just melt & disconnects.

Hence when solder you need to ensure each every strand of the wires stick properly to the terminal with enough solder.
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Old 12-25-2009, 11:07 PM   #69
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what are some iron's yall are using, besides the team checkpoint? I'm thinking about upgrading my single temp iron now that Im actually starting to use it some.
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Old 12-25-2009, 11:18 PM   #70
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Marine,
Any advice on soldering the tabs of Li-Poly batteries. I'm not sure what the tabs are made of but soldering them sux.
You mean the individual cell tabs?

If the tabs are large (contain a lot of metal/surface area) then they act like a heat sink and you need a very good iron and large tip to solder them well. You may also need to up the temp about 50*, no higher than 750* though.

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what are some iron's yall are using, besides the team checkpoint? I'm thinking about upgrading my single temp iron now that Im actually starting to use it some.
The Checkpoint is just a re-branded Hakko. It is a good Iron, and I pick it over the actual Hakko because the graphics skin for it does not cover the temp markings. Weller makes some decent Irons for around the same price, but their quality ones, comparable to the Checkpoint and Hakko will cost around $150. The LPR station is thoroughly kick a** but is over kill for hobby use, it is basically a high end unit used for electronics repair, and you pay that high end price as well.
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Old 12-25-2009, 11:22 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by Toh WL View Post
More solder does not make things better. If you are running on brushless modified motor.. Excess solder will melt causing short to motor & ESC. The wiring to the motor just melt & disconnects.

Hence when solder you need to ensure each every strand of the wires stick properly to the terminal with enough solder.
Thats a lot of amps!
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Old 12-26-2009, 12:44 AM   #72
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If your solder connections are melting and coming apart when running the electronics you have other issues to worry about...

Personally I like the Lead Free Novak Silver Solder.
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Old 12-26-2009, 07:21 AM   #73
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If your solder connections are melting and coming apart when running the electronics you have other issues to worry about...

Personally I like the Lead Free Novak Silver Solder.
Try Kester 63/37 you'll change your tune and save a lot of $ too.
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Old 12-26-2009, 01:39 PM   #74
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Try Kester 63/37 you'll change your tune and save a lot of $ too.
Thanks, I will give it a try. I have a feeling I will like it better than the Novak SS.
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Old 12-26-2009, 07:39 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaPeRo View Post
If your solder connections are melting and coming apart when running the electronics you have other issues to worry about...

Personally I like the Lead Free Novak Silver Solder.
Yeah it takes a lot of amps to heat up solder connections that much.

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Try Kester 63/37 you'll change your tune and save a lot of $ too.
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Thanks, I will give it a try. I have a feeling I will like it better than the Novak SS.
Lead free sucks, and silver solders are more poisonous than the leaded stuff. 63/37 is the best solder you can use.
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