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Old 10-30-2009, 12:11 PM   #31
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Marine- Very informative post. Thank you.

I have always used RMA core 60/40 or 63/37 solder and remember hearing that extra flux generally was not needed.

Now that I know its better to use extra flux, can you give me a little more detail on how to use it (how and where to apply? how much? etc...) . Thanks again.
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Old 10-30-2009, 07:47 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by nougat View Post
Marine- Very informative post. Thank you.

I have always used RMA core 60/40 or 63/37 solder and remember hearing that extra flux generally was not needed.

Now that I know its better to use extra flux, can you give me a little more detail on how to use it (how and where to apply? how much? etc...) . Thanks again.
Basically you put the flux wherever you want solder to go. A light coat or a drop or two is enough. When you are tinning a wire a drop should be enough for up to 14ga wire for a 1/2 inch strip, 1 and half to 2 drops for 12ga or 10ga. A drip to tin the post and another drip to complete the joint. When soldering a wire to a post heat the side of the post close to the top, a little drop there can help heat up the post. Remember heat the part not the solder. You actually apply solder to the side of the wire opposite of the tip, solder will flow toward the heat. Flux can help the heat transfer if you have issues, you can also apply a small amount of solder to the iron tip. The air dried flux I mention using helps by staying put and not dripping off the parts, but because it is thick and more concentrated it is a little harder to clean. But the fact it will not run down the post and into the case of a component is a big plus. It also works better at tinning wires, just a small amount on the wire, about a drops worth for 10ga is more than enough, just spread it out a bit becuse it likes to stay as a glob untill heated. When it gets hot, it will thin out and flow into the wire, but not as far under the insulation as liquid will which is good.
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Old 11-10-2009, 06:47 PM   #33
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Bump.... (this thread can not help anyone if it gets lost several pages back)
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Old 11-10-2009, 07:12 PM   #34
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good info. I need to buy a new iron.
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Old 11-22-2009, 04:56 PM   #35
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A good iron is always a good investment.
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Old 12-10-2009, 10:10 PM   #36
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Re-bump
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Old 12-18-2009, 07:57 PM   #37
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free bump
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Old 12-18-2009, 10:50 PM   #38
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lol thanks
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Old 12-19-2009, 01:04 AM   #39
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Yep...

This is an awesome write up...

I will add from my experience tonight...

DO NOT use cheap wal-mart solder just because you ran out of your good stuff and can't make yourself wait till you can get the good stuff.

It's just not worth it.

I rewired a speed control tonight, and ran outta my good lead solder... Had to run to Wal-Mart to get any kind of solder at all.

It was such a PAIN... I'll be re-doing the entire car again once I can grab some more of the leaded stuff from the old mans house. This should get me through races tomorrow though I hope.

This stuff says on the back 99.3% Tin... GEEEEZE!? What the heck am I supposed to do with this junk!?
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Old 12-19-2009, 10:30 PM   #40
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Thats a tin/copper lead free solder... Lead free solder works, and with care you can make a good joint with it, but it is a hassle to use, and does not mix well with lead solder. Order a 1lb roll of 63/37 lead solder online for about $20, it will last you a long time.
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Old 12-20-2009, 12:18 PM   #41
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1000 thanks Marine!
I just read all this thread and learned many things from you.

Here are my comments and questions:

- I read that the rosin in the Kester 44 is "non-conductive".
Maybe all rosins are non-conductive or mildly conductive... but, isn't it bad for our application? Isn't its electric resistance an issue? Isn't it better to avoid, if unnecessary, the use of rosin flux because of this?
I know that some rosin evaporates with the heat of soldering but what about the residue?

- Kester states that "Flux cored solder wire has a limited shelf life determined by the alloy used in the wire. For alloys containing > 70% lead, the shelf life is two years from date of manufacture. Other alloys have a shelf life of three years from date of manufacture". What happens after these 3 years? and how can we be sure to buy recent solder wire? where do you suggest to buy it online to be sure that it's recent?
I live in Europe and tin/lead wire is forbidden here therefore I must find a trustable source online extra-UE.

- I would suggest to add more videos

- I read that RMA means "rosin mildly activated" while you wrote "rosin medium activated"
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Old 12-20-2009, 07:34 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imbuter2000 View Post
1000 thanks Marine!
I just read all this thread and learned many things from you.

Here are my comments and questions:

- I read that the rosin in the Kester 44 is "non-conductive".
Maybe all rosins are non-conductive or mildly conductive... but, isn't it bad for our application? Isn't its electric resistance an issue? Isn't it better to avoid, if unnecessary, the use of rosin flux because of this?
I know that some rosin evaporates with the heat of soldering but what about the residue?

- Kester states that "Flux cored solder wire has a limited shelf life determined by the alloy used in the wire. For alloys containing > 70% lead, the shelf life is two years from date of manufacture. Other alloys have a shelf life of three years from date of manufacture". What happens after these 3 years? and how can we be sure to buy recent solder wire? where do you suggest to buy it online to be sure that it's recent?
I live in Europe and tin/lead wire is forbidden here therefore I must find a trustable source online extra-UE.

- I would suggest to add more videos

- I read that RMA means "rosin mildly activated" while you wrote "rosin medium activated"
Yes, flux can leave residue, plus any that drips will still be around, that is why you must clean after you solder. There are downsides to flux, and that is that you need to clean connections after you solder, because it can corrode or cause some shorting. The benefits are worth the extra time. Besides, if you use cored solder, you will still have flux residue left over, and non-cored solder will not flow without adding flux.

Shelf life, metals corrode over time, and flux speeds the process. The corrosion makes the solder not flow as well. It will still work for years on end, but will not be as easy to use as fresh. Just seal any extra up in an airtight container and you can even throw in some moisture absorbing material to make it last for practically forever. I have some that is near 10 years old that was factory sealed in plastic, it still works great.

I usually get my solder from work... so as for a an online source, I can't help you. I would try to find an online electronics supply site, one with a contact email that you can ask questions through. I also suggest getting 63/37 solder.

Yeah the lead free crap over there sucks, a mandatory electronic recycle law would be better for all I think. Less lead in the landfills and better quality connections in the products.

I will see if I can find some more good videos, If I get time, I may make my own. It may take a while though.

RMA, it can be said either way, its the same thing in the long run.
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Old 12-20-2009, 08:44 PM   #43
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I absolutely love this thread. I wish there were more informative threads like this about other aspects of RC racing.

A big thank you marine!
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Old 12-20-2009, 08:48 PM   #44
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I suggest a video clip is just good enough for beginners. As many will be blur when reading the texts.
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Old 12-21-2009, 10:06 AM   #45
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I read that the rosin in the Kester 44 is "non-conductive".
Maybe all rosins are non-conductive or mildly conductive... but, isn't it bad for our application? Isn't its electric resistance an issue? Isn't it better to avoid, if unnecessary, the use of added rosin flux because of this?
Afterall in the video of the Tekin RX8 he solders easiliy without added flux.
I know that some rosin evaporates with the heat of soldering but what about the residue that remain mixed in the alloy or, even worse, between the alloy and the connector, that cannot be cleaned?

Quote:
Originally Posted by marine6680 View Post
I will see if I can find some more good videos, If I get time, I may make my own. It may take a while though.
I tried to post the link to the video where Traxxas shows how to solder Traxxas connectors but this forum don't let me post URLs because I'm don't have enough posts...
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