R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Racing Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-04-2016, 10:32 AM   #1
Tech Regular
 
bmx_ican92's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 267
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default Becoming serious about buggy racing?

I have been running a couple different classes with different cars and i have really enjoyed running 10th scale buggy more than anything else. I have been using an AE b4.1 and have gotten to the point where i can consistently win the sportsman class at my local track.

I ordered a B6 kit last night because i have decided to just focus on racing buggies and really learning the platform and becoming in depth with set ups and racing techniques.

That being said can you guys give some pointers or even some resources online where i can really learn about buggies and racing them?
bmx_ican92 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2016, 12:40 PM   #2
Tech Elite
 
GrandeGixxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Waldorf, MD
Posts: 2,862
Trader Rating: 14 (100%+)
Default

You can download Hudy's tuning guide on their site. It is pretty comprehensive.

http://www.hudy.net/xhudy/products/p...8&kategoria=64
GrandeGixxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2016, 02:42 PM   #3
Tech Elite
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,306
Trader Rating: 28 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmx_ican92 View Post
I have been running a couple different classes with different cars and i have really enjoyed running 10th scale buggy more than anything else. I have been using an AE b4.1 and have gotten to the point where i can consistently win the sportsman class at my local track.

I ordered a B6 kit last night because i have decided to just focus on racing buggies and really learning the platform and becoming in depth with set ups and racing techniques.

That being said can you guys give some pointers or even some resources online where i can really learn about buggies and racing them?
The absolutely best way to learn is to go run the crap out of the thing. Then run it some more, and then some more again. This will do some imortant things for you. You will get obnoxious amount of track time, that will make you confident and comfortable driving your buggy. It will force you to wrench on your ride so it is prepared for each outing. You'll be wrenching on it so often, you will become proficient on fixing it properly the first time, and the most efficient way to get things apart and back together. You'll learn your tools, and also what is likely to be wrong when you have a problem.

While you're at it, get different springs and oils. Print a bunch of setup sheets, and get a new notebook for keeping track of your changes, what they did, and how they made the car feel different.

Sounds like you're already a competent driver, now start changing things. One at a time. Run a pack, then write notes about what felt different.

And while you're doing all this, don't do it with a blazing fast motor. Do it with something that's controllable and lets you hit the same lines each time. It helps immensely if you have access to laptimes during practice, and learn how to use those as a tool also.

Be prepared to have the new car drive completely different from your current b4. I recently switched from a T4 to the T5M. It is taking a bit of time to adjust to how differently it acts/reacts, and get it setup for myself. It is a dramatic difference in handling between rear and mid-motor IMO. It's faster though, just takes getting used to.

When you get the new car, put the box stock setup on it and go drive it for a few battery packs. Maybe some more. Then start making the changes one at a time like I recommended above.

The Hudy tuning guide mentioned in the above post is great. It may make you lose your mind reading it, but that's just because it has so much information in it.

All that said boils down to this, you'll learn about driving/racing your car by doing it rather than reading about it.

Good luck and have fun with your new car!
__________________
Team Associated & CRC
Trackstar & Hobbywing esc's
Spektrum radios, GensAce batts, turnigy servos.
Keeping racing fun and affordable with my 8y.o. twins :)
The best track I've raced is the one in my backyard!
jbrow1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 01:43 PM   #4
Tech Adept
 
awtwac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 129
Trader Rating: 8 (100%+)
Default

I'm an offroad/buggy neophyte myself, and just started a few months ago with a B6. Based on what I've learned over these last few weeks, I would suggest that you start by finding out which tires the most guys (especially the fast ones) are using at your track. Then go here:

https://www.teamassociated.com/cars_...anuals_setups/

Find the setup sheet that most closely mirrors your track type/surface, and start with that setup. Pay particular attention to springs, oils, ride height, and link spacing. This should get you 90% dialed in. After that, it's a good idea to take a look at what everyone is doing at your track and see if any of their settings will work for you. Good luck and hope this helped.
awtwac is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 07:59 PM.


Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net