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Old 05-14-2014, 03:40 PM   #16
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yea, rly good job there!
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Old 06-05-2014, 08:11 AM   #17
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Anyone who paints on a regular bases does it for the love. Its about peeling that clear wrap off the fresh paint for the first time to reveal your hard work! Sure price equivalent to work done would be great, but I knew it sucked when I got into it.
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Old 06-18-2014, 07:00 PM   #18
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that's cool
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:01 PM   #19
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Thought I would weigh in with a little insight into the business that I have built to support my racing addiction. www.rcbombshells.com

Having developed a craft which I studied and learned entirely from the guidence of great painters on this sight, I have successfuly painted over 450 shells to date for customers around the world.

My experience has crafted over time through countless hours in the garage at night in effort to create a name for myself and keep up with the never ending demands of the market (which is impossible).

As I do not depend entirely on my rc painting to feed my family, it has evolved into a time for money thing. I would agree that many painters do not charge enough. It doesn't bother me at all that some may consider my production to be too expensive. This was by design. Through my experience, I have not learned to paint any faster, cut any corners, or shave costs to earn myself anymore than about $10.00 an hour. I have a process and my customers pay for that process.

I am first and foremost a racer who paints and not a painter who occasionally races. By my calculations I can only paint around 100-150 shells a year. As such, I hoped to create a demand which could eventually justify the sacrifice of my time to putting a great product into my customers hands.

As you will find with all painters, they have their own style, flavor and way of doing business. As this thread is created for the purpose of tips, I hope my business model may shed some light to the consumer on what our lifestyle is like and offer some ideas to fellow painters who may be looking to improve their opperation.

PAY to SPRAY
I have never and will never paint anything without payment in full from a client. The purpose of this was to initiate movement on my part will incur some form of commitment on the client's part. Nothing I hate more than asking someone for money, or better yet, chase them around. Once I get the funds in place it secures a position in the never ending queue of clients I have waiting. Pressure now is on me. How do I weed out the tightwads that want their shell done by next week and don't even have the bills to get started. Real simple. I ask, "How can I put you in line infront of customers who have already paid?" This simple model has now groomed my clients to already undertand they are NO PRIORITY to me until they have paid me.

Funny how paid in full customers also aren't the impatient (have it done by this weekend) customers.

I cringe to hear of stories of customers who weren't happy with the work and opted to not pay their painter. What! You know what the painter could do or couldn't do well, by seeing his work. Buyer should beware of what they are paying for. Or worse, I heard stories of painters knocking out some great work only to find the customer no longer has that platform or sold that car and doesn't need the body anymore. Poor painter has to eat it and hope to peddle a painted body on RCT. I vow to never have either of those issues.

Have I ever had a customer not happy with my work? Not yet. They may opt to vote with their wallet next time and not come back, but I have been fortunate in that respect.

COMPETITION
Painter drama? In my area, sure, but I can guess it is all started and ending with the racers (customers) and not the painters themselves. I am thankful for my competitors as they offer a different product and keep themselves busy doing what they do best. Again we each have our own flavor, pricing, and history of good/bad communication, turnaround and whatever. The best way to understand how my product differs, is to also try the competition. There is way more work out there than reputable painters, for sure.

PRICING
As a greenhorn I started out charging per color. This got very confusing and turned off more folks than not. I try to keep the thought process with the client to a minimum, as it tends to push people away. I came up with a price I chose, based on what my time is worth to me, not the customer. Again less than $10.00 an hour. I have a base price and incorporate the amount of paint it takes to get the job done. "Can you paint an eagle swooping down on a dragon with a carbon fiber checkered flag and skulls and stuff". Ah, no keep stepping, that is not my specialty and I know my limitations. If you don't know my limitations, please see my gallery of works. That is not my forte.

The best way to order a body is understand your who your painter is, how much he wants and give him a photo example of what you like or don't like. Give him some direction to go, than stand back, wait patiently and let him do his magic. It's funny how creation evolves when you have loathing for the client. I actually painted once, very angry at the client (he blackmailed me so-to-speak) and the paint scheme came out accordingly. Nobody would ever be able to tell, but I could tell you when I saw that paint scheme (the client was a jackass)! I sometimes see how terrible a paint job came out from another very reputable painter and immediately understand, this client is probably a pain in the ass and this was his last paint job for good reason. Beware.

Then you paint for those you love and blow yourself away with creativity, execution and design.

Keeping the end user in mind I hoped to create a website that was easy to follow, easy to order, communicate and feel my web designer (like a painter) delivered very well.

Hats off to all the incredible work all you guys on here have done and continue to do. It's very inspiring to be able to share our works around the world in seconds to those hungry to see it. For that we love you RCTech.


Godspeed
-Rocco
RC Bombshells
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Old 08-31-2015, 01:52 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RC Bombshells View Post
Thought I would weigh in with a little insight into the business that I have built to support my racing addiction. www.rcbombshells.com

Having developed a craft which I studied and learned entirely from the guidence of great painters on this sight, I have successfuly painted over 450 shells to date for customers around the world.

My experience has crafted over time through countless hours in the garage at night in effort to create a name for myself and keep up with the never ending demands of the market (which is impossible).

As I do not depend entirely on my rc painting to feed my family, it has evolved into a time for money thing. I would agree that many painters do not charge enough. It doesn't bother me at all that some may consider my production to be too expensive. This was by design. Through my experience, I have not learned to paint any faster, cut any corners, or shave costs to earn myself anymore than about $10.00 an hour. I have a process and my customers pay for that process.

I am first and foremost a racer who paints and not a painter who occasionally races. By my calculations I can only paint around 100-150 shells a year. As such, I hoped to create a demand which could eventually justify the sacrifice of my time to putting a great product into my customers hands.

As you will find with all painters, they have their own style, flavor and way of doing business. As this thread is created for the purpose of tips, I hope my business model may shed some light to the consumer on what our lifestyle is like and offer some ideas to fellow painters who may be looking to improve their opperation.

PAY to SPRAY
I have never and will never paint anything without payment in full from a client. The purpose of this was to initiate movement on my part will incur some form of commitment on the client's part. Nothing I hate more than asking someone for money, or better yet, chase them around. Once I get the funds in place it secures a position in the never ending queue of clients I have waiting. Pressure now is on me. How do I weed out the tightwads that want their shell done by next week and don't even have the bills to get started. Real simple. I ask, "How can I put you in line infront of customers who have already paid?" This simple model has now groomed my clients to already undertand they are NO PRIORITY to me until they have paid me.

Funny how paid in full customers also aren't the impatient (have it done by this weekend) customers.

I cringe to hear of stories of customers who weren't happy with the work and opted to not pay their painter. What! You know what the painter could do or couldn't do well, by seeing his work. Buyer should beware of what they are paying for. Or worse, I heard stories of painters knocking out some great work only to find the customer no longer has that platform or sold that car and doesn't need the body anymore. Poor painter has to eat it and hope to peddle a painted body on RCT. I vow to never have either of those issues.

Have I ever had a customer not happy with my work? Not yet. They may opt to vote with their wallet next time and not come back, but I have been fortunate in that respect.

COMPETITION
Painter drama? In my area, sure, but I can guess it is all started and ending with the racers (customers) and not the painters themselves. I am thankful for my competitors as they offer a different product and keep themselves busy doing what they do best. Again we each have our own flavor, pricing, and history of good/bad communication, turnaround and whatever. The best way to understand how my product differs, is to also try the competition. There is way more work out there than reputable painters, for sure.

PRICING
As a greenhorn I started out charging per color. This got very confusing and turned off more folks than not. I try to keep the thought process with the client to a minimum, as it tends to push people away. I came up with a price I chose, based on what my time is worth to me, not the customer. Again less than $10.00 an hour. I have a base price and incorporate the amount of paint it takes to get the job done. "Can you paint an eagle swooping down on a dragon with a carbon fiber checkered flag and skulls and stuff". Ah, no keep stepping, that is not my specialty and I know my limitations. If you don't know my limitations, please see my gallery of works. That is not my forte.

The best way to order a body is understand your who your painter is, how much he wants and give him a photo example of what you like or don't like. Give him some direction to go, than stand back, wait patiently and let him do his magic. It's funny how creation evolves when you have loathing for the client. I actually painted once, very angry at the client (he blackmailed me so-to-speak) and the paint scheme came out accordingly. Nobody would ever be able to tell, but I could tell you when I saw that paint scheme (the client was a jackass)! I sometimes see how terrible a paint job came out from another very reputable painter and immediately understand, this client is probably a pain in the ass and this was his last paint job for good reason. Beware.

Then you paint for those you love and blow yourself away with creativity, execution and design.

Keeping the end user in mind I hoped to create a website that was easy to follow, easy to order, communicate and feel my web designer (like a painter) delivered very well.

Hats off to all the incredible work all you guys on here have done and continue to do. It's very inspiring to be able to share our works around the world in seconds to those hungry to see it. For that we love you RCTech.


Godspeed
-Rocco
RC Bombshells
That's are great insight Rocco as I'm in the same boat at the moment. Was going to ask a painter there thoughts, prices and process but you have done it for me. I started doing it for fun and few people wanted me to paint body's for them and was a bit skeptical about doing it. Thanks for info, i can process it and decide whether to do it or not now.
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Old 11-27-2015, 08:46 PM   #21
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For those who have been wanting to order a body, here are a few tips to make a smooth transaction and a pleasant experience. These are just suggested tips and every experience will vary depending on customer/painter.

1. Contact.
Contact the painter directly either PM, email, or phone. Do not just post on his or her thread and keep bugging until he/she responds on their thread. Not everyone checks their threads everyday, every minute. That really gets annoying. Do not post a "Looking for a paintjob to be done!" thread either. The painting thread is not about a bidding war. It is about sharing.
2. Commission.
Explain in detail your desired paintscheme as well as your budget right away. YOU can go for an hour about what you want, possibly costing about 20 hours worth of labor, then hit a painter with "can you do it for $40?". Big NO NO! Be realistic in your demands. Not everyone paints RC Cars for a living but even then, TIME is something that can never be given back, so please pay accordingly. Do not go around getting quotes from other painters then challenging a painter that "Painter XXXX will only do it for $20". I personally will automatically let the customer know im not interested in their business. You obviously know and LIKE the painter's skills otherwise why would you approach them in the first place? On top of that, why LOW BALL THEM?
3. Payment
Be ready to put down at least 50% of the quoted price of the commissioned work especially if a painter provides a concept drawing of your paintjob. Yes, that too can be billed for it does take time to draw/design/color your concept. After the concept is done and you approve, send them the 50% payment and the rest when the paintjob is completed. Usually, a painter will provide the finished product with a picture of the work. Obviously, some paintjobs with vary in color due to different lighting and cameras but that is just how it is. If it is just like the concept, then it should be good to go. If you are unhappy with the end result, you can always discuss IN PRIVATE with your painter your concerns. But in truth, if it looks like the concept, you did approve of it and is up to the painter to remedy it or not.
4. Praise
Most of us are pretty happy with our painter's work. It is good practice to PRAISE and THANK a painter publicly like his/her thread and help advertise his/her work. It is also good practice to TIP your painter. Yes, like Tatoo Artists and Waiters, etc., tipping is allowed. Showing you appreciate their hard work as well as them taking the time to communicate and cater to your painting needs deserves a reward as well. RC Painting is a SUPER SMALL community in the RC Industry. Painters do talk...so if you are a hard customer to deal with, word will get around. Be a good customer and you will get what you want. An awesome Paintjob!

Hope you all find this entertaining and helpful!
So what is the going price for a paint job, including body cost for like a Speed 6 TC BODY painted in what you would call an average job?

Bill
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Old 11-30-2015, 07:15 AM   #22
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Bill,

From my experience $45-$60 would be a great price for a sedan paint job (don't know what basic is). So maybe $100 with the body, you'd be set.

I would encourage you to check out some of the guys websites to find out more info.

Myself, I wouldn't touch it for less than $80.00 (just paint) and you'd be one of my 1st sedan paint jobs, as I do not cater to that line of racer as much as off road. On road tends to go through bodies much faster for the sportsman guys. I simply couldn't keep up with the lower price demand.

Hope this helps.

Best wishes,

-Rocco
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Old 04-03-2016, 07:10 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RC Bombshells View Post
Thought I would weigh in with a little insight into the business that I have built to support my racing addiction. www.rcbombshells.com

Having developed a craft which I studied and learned entirely from the guidence of great painters on this sight, I have successfuly painted over 450 shells to date for customers around the world.

My experience has crafted over time through countless hours in the garage at night in effort to create a name for myself and keep up with the never ending demands of the market (which is impossible).

As I do not depend entirely on my rc painting to feed my family, it has evolved into a time for money thing. I would agree that many painters do not charge enough. It doesn't bother me at all that some may consider my production to be too expensive. This was by design. Through my experience, I have not learned to paint any faster, cut any corners, or shave costs to earn myself anymore than about $10.00 an hour. I have a process and my customers pay for that process.

I am first and foremost a racer who paints and not a painter who occasionally races. By my calculations I can only paint around 100-150 shells a year. As such, I hoped to create a demand which could eventually justify the sacrifice of my time to putting a great product into my customers hands.

As you will find with all painters, they have their own style, flavor and way of doing business. As this thread is created for the purpose of tips, I hope my business model may shed some light to the consumer on what our lifestyle is like and offer some ideas to fellow painters who may be looking to improve their opperation.

PAY to SPRAY
I have never and will never paint anything without payment in full from a client. The purpose of this was to initiate movement on my part will incur some form of commitment on the client's part. Nothing I hate more than asking someone for money, or better yet, chase them around. Once I get the funds in place it secures a position in the never ending queue of clients I have waiting. Pressure now is on me. How do I weed out the tightwads that want their shell done by next week and don't even have the bills to get started. Real simple. I ask, "How can I put you in line infront of customers who have already paid?" This simple model has now groomed my clients to already undertand they are NO PRIORITY to me until they have paid me.

Funny how paid in full customers also aren't the impatient (have it done by this weekend) customers.

I cringe to hear of stories of customers who weren't happy with the work and opted to not pay their painter. What! You know what the painter could do or couldn't do well, by seeing his work. Buyer should beware of what they are paying for. Or worse, I heard stories of painters knocking out some great work only to find the customer no longer has that platform or sold that car and doesn't need the body anymore. Poor painter has to eat it and hope to peddle a painted body on RCT. I vow to never have either of those issues.

Have I ever had a customer not happy with my work? Not yet. They may opt to vote with their wallet next time and not come back, but I have been fortunate in that respect.

COMPETITION
Painter drama? In my area, sure, but I can guess it is all started and ending with the racers (customers) and not the painters themselves. I am thankful for my competitors as they offer a different product and keep themselves busy doing what they do best. Again we each have our own flavor, pricing, and history of good/bad communication, turnaround and whatever. The best way to understand how my product differs, is to also try the competition. There is way more work out there than reputable painters, for sure.

PRICING
As a greenhorn I started out charging per color. This got very confusing and turned off more folks than not. I try to keep the thought process with the client to a minimum, as it tends to push people away. I came up with a price I chose, based on what my time is worth to me, not the customer. Again less than $10.00 an hour. I have a base price and incorporate the amount of paint it takes to get the job done. "Can you paint an eagle swooping down on a dragon with a carbon fiber checkered flag and skulls and stuff". Ah, no keep stepping, that is not my specialty and I know my limitations. If you don't know my limitations, please see my gallery of works. That is not my forte.

The best way to order a body is understand your who your painter is, how much he wants and give him a photo example of what you like or don't like. Give him some direction to go, than stand back, wait patiently and let him do his magic. It's funny how creation evolves when you have loathing for the client. I actually painted once, very angry at the client (he blackmailed me so-to-speak) and the paint scheme came out accordingly. Nobody would ever be able to tell, but I could tell you when I saw that paint scheme (the client was a jackass)! I sometimes see how terrible a paint job came out from another very reputable painter and immediately understand, this client is probably a pain in the ass and this was his last paint job for good reason. Beware.

Then you paint for those you love and blow yourself away with creativity, execution and design.

Keeping the end user in mind I hoped to create a website that was easy to follow, easy to order, communicate and feel my web designer (like a painter) delivered very well.

Hats off to all the incredible work all you guys on here have done and continue to do. It's very inspiring to be able to share our works around the world in seconds to those hungry to see it. For that we love you RCTech.


Godspeed
-Rocco
RC Bombshells
Amen brother! I couldn't have written it better myself.
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Old 04-03-2016, 07:13 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RC Bombshells View Post
Thought I would weigh in with a little insight into the business that I have built to support my racing addiction. www.rcbombshells.com

Having developed a craft which I studied and learned entirely from the guidence of great painters on this sight, I have successfuly painted over 450 shells to date for customers around the world.

My experience has crafted over time through countless hours in the garage at night in effort to create a name for myself and keep up with the never ending demands of the market (which is impossible).

As I do not depend entirely on my rc painting to feed my family, it has evolved into a time for money thing. I would agree that many painters do not charge enough. It doesn't bother me at all that some may consider my production to be too expensive. This was by design. Through my experience, I have not learned to paint any faster, cut any corners, or shave costs to earn myself anymore than about $10.00 an hour. I have a process and my customers pay for that process.

I am first and foremost a racer who paints and not a painter who occasionally races. By my calculations I can only paint around 100-150 shells a year. As such, I hoped to create a demand which could eventually justify the sacrifice of my time to putting a great product into my customers hands.

As you will find with all painters, they have their own style, flavor and way of doing business. As this thread is created for the purpose of tips, I hope my business model may shed some light to the consumer on what our lifestyle is like and offer some ideas to fellow painters who may be looking to improve their opperation.

PAY to SPRAY
I have never and will never paint anything without payment in full from a client. The purpose of this was to initiate movement on my part will incur some form of commitment on the client's part. Nothing I hate more than asking someone for money, or better yet, chase them around. Once I get the funds in place it secures a position in the never ending queue of clients I have waiting. Pressure now is on me. How do I weed out the tightwads that want their shell done by next week and don't even have the bills to get started. Real simple. I ask, "How can I put you in line infront of customers who have already paid?" This simple model has now groomed my clients to already undertand they are NO PRIORITY to me until they have paid me.

Funny how paid in full customers also aren't the impatient (have it done by this weekend) customers.

I cringe to hear of stories of customers who weren't happy with the work and opted to not pay their painter. What! You know what the painter could do or couldn't do well, by seeing his work. Buyer should beware of what they are paying for. Or worse, I heard stories of painters knocking out some great work only to find the customer no longer has that platform or sold that car and doesn't need the body anymore. Poor painter has to eat it and hope to peddle a painted body on RCT. I vow to never have either of those issues.

Have I ever had a customer not happy with my work? Not yet. They may opt to vote with their wallet next time and not come back, but I have been fortunate in that respect.

COMPETITION
Painter drama? In my area, sure, but I can guess it is all started and ending with the racers (customers) and not the painters themselves. I am thankful for my competitors as they offer a different product and keep themselves busy doing what they do best. Again we each have our own flavor, pricing, and history of good/bad communication, turnaround and whatever. The best way to understand how my product differs, is to also try the competition. There is way more work out there than reputable painters, for sure.

PRICING
As a greenhorn I started out charging per color. This got very confusing and turned off more folks than not. I try to keep the thought process with the client to a minimum, as it tends to push people away. I came up with a price I chose, based on what my time is worth to me, not the customer. Again less than $10.00 an hour. I have a base price and incorporate the amount of paint it takes to get the job done. "Can you paint an eagle swooping down on a dragon with a carbon fiber checkered flag and skulls and stuff". Ah, no keep stepping, that is not my specialty and I know my limitations. If you don't know my limitations, please see my gallery of works. That is not my forte.

The best way to order a body is understand your who your painter is, how much he wants and give him a photo example of what you like or don't like. Give him some direction to go, than stand back, wait patiently and let him do his magic. It's funny how creation evolves when you have loathing for the client. I actually painted once, very angry at the client (he blackmailed me so-to-speak) and the paint scheme came out accordingly. Nobody would ever be able to tell, but I could tell you when I saw that paint scheme (the client was a jackass)! I sometimes see how terrible a paint job came out from another very reputable painter and immediately understand, this client is probably a pain in the ass and this was his last paint job for good reason. Beware.

Then you paint for those you love and blow yourself away with creativity, execution and design.

Keeping the end user in mind I hoped to create a website that was easy to follow, easy to order, communicate and feel my web designer (like a painter) delivered very well.

Hats off to all the incredible work all you guys on here have done and continue to do. It's very inspiring to be able to share our works around the world in seconds to those hungry to see it. For that we love you RCTech.


Godspeed
-Rocco
RC Bombshells
Amen brother! I couldn't have put it better myself.
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Old 12-03-2016, 12:36 PM   #25
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Great write up and replies. So how do I find someone to paint a body for me?
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Old 12-04-2016, 04:30 PM   #26
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Great write up and replies. So how do I find someone to paint a body for me?
The last 2 posts were from fellas who paint bodies (RC Bombshells and elex300) I would start there..
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