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Old 10-01-2009, 11:33 PM   #1
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Default Do titanium screws make a diffrence?

I just spent some money on a lipo reciever pack for my MBX6, and I changed the center drive shafts to aluminum to lighten everything up. I dont know where to stop now, is it worth spending $80 on titanium screws and maybe changing all the drive shafts to aluminum, the list keeps going if you want.
Does anyone have an oppinion if it makes much of a difference in the handling for the buggy? Does anyone have any good ideas how to lighten the vehicle withought spending a fortune? Thanks
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Old 10-02-2009, 12:23 AM   #2
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I just spent some money on a lipo reciever pack for my MBX6, and I changed the center drive shafts to aluminum to lighten everything up. I dont know where to stop now, is it worth spending $80 on titanium screws and maybe changing all the drive shafts to aluminum, the list keeps going if you want.
Does anyone have an oppinion if it makes much of a difference in the handling for the buggy? Does anyone have any good ideas how to lighten the vehicle withought spending a fortune? Thanks

Lighter isn't necessarily better. Lighter buggies will be driven faster only by top racers, but for most of us a little bit more of inertia helps tame our cars down a bit. Modern cars are tough as heck, last-gen engines give you 10mn runtimes already, I'd rather spend $80 on tires and fuel than on a titanium screw set...

JMHO of course

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Old 10-02-2009, 12:42 AM   #3
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Is it worth it in total? No, your cost vs. return isn't high enough.

Something like Tit. turnbuckles; or light outdrives, something that knocks some serious grams off is worth it. Screws are kind of a last on the list type of thing.

In the end, it is the sum of the parts that counts and they do drop several grams off the car. It's not going to win the race, your driving still has to be the main focus.

I've always found that lighter is better though and every little bit counts when it comes to fuel mileage.

The BIGGEST place I've noticed an improvement by lightening the car (any platform) was tire wear.

Side note, but a friend and I both run Jammin' X2 truggies. My truck is over 100g (a little over two "normal" servos) lighter than his. We both ran the same track with the same tires. His are showing signs of wear and look BEAT. Mine look new and I don't think it's totally from driving styles because I'm putting down a little more power than him as well.
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Old 10-02-2009, 06:51 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Truggyman View Post
I just spent some money on a lipo reciever pack for my MBX6, and I changed the center drive shafts to aluminum to lighten everything up. I dont know where to stop now, is it worth spending $80 on titanium screws and maybe changing all the drive shafts to aluminum, the list keeps going if you want.
Does anyone have an oppinion if it makes much of a difference in the handling for the buggy? Does anyone have any good ideas how to lighten the vehicle withought spending a fortune? Thanks
I love titanium screws. They should come in every kit...

I don't drive the Mugen, but I used their screw kits for my car and was very surprised. With the Lipo and screws (and some aluminum lock nuts), you're looking at nearly 220 grams difference. That's right around 8oz or a half pound. But, WHERE it takes the weight off is the most important. It's within the whole car - not just one area.

Even if you go underweight (ROAR Spec), you can add weight where YOU want it. Weight then becomes a tuning aide and not a burden.

Then... they don't rust. Which is nice for many reasons.

Lastly, and least important. They do look cool. Slightly dull silver screws all over the buggy looks pretty trick.

Now, the drawback. Since you said "$80" I assume you're getting the Mugen screw kits. They are high content titanium (unlike Lunsford), which means they're SUPER light... they will feel like nothing in your hand. BUT they are soft. Much easier to strip. I ended up getting an extra upper kit for spares - just to have them on hand. Thru-out the season, I changed out a few that were getting 'loose'.

One last thing to add. The cost may seem high, but you CAN re-use them on your next buggy. ...and the buggy after that.
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Old 10-02-2009, 07:00 AM   #5
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Thanks for the answers guys, im leaning towards spending money on the rest of the aluminum drivetrain parts.
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Old 10-02-2009, 07:14 AM   #6
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Now, the drawback. Since you said "$80" I assume you're getting the Mugen screw kits. They are high content titanium (unlike Lunsford), which means they're SUPER light... they will feel like nothing in your hand. BUT they are soft.
I figured high Ti content made them stronger too, not soft. Please elaborate?
Are the Lunsford ones stronger, but not as light?
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Old 10-02-2009, 08:40 AM   #7
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^ I've been wondering that because I've had both Mugen and Lunsford screws on hand.

The Lunsfords seem to be a little heavier, but I didn't chase it too far because they're the only ones that had US Std. screws for a Losi.
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Old 10-02-2009, 08:46 AM   #8
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I figured high Ti content made them stronger too, not soft. Please elaborate?
Are the Lunsford ones stronger, but not as light?
Titanium is actually quite soft, but when 'mixed' with certain alloys, it becomes VERY strong to the point of being brittle.

Lunsford uses 6AL/4V, high alloy content titanium...which *IS* the titanium to use for ti-rods and such. It's the same titanium they use for screws, but it's spendy stuff. Since it contains more alloys, it's a little heavier than the Mugen screws.

You can see the difference. The Mugen stuff is rather dull and the Lunsford is very shiny. Mugen uses a higher content of titanium and less alloys. This makes them VERY light, but more elastic. They are almost like un-natural aluminum.

Most of the screws - I've found - do not require super strong 6AL/4V titanium alloy. The Mugen titanium is excellent stuff for keeping plastic together - and more.

I have all titanium screws, 95% Mugen, and a few Lunsfords. I bent the top shock mount screw, which also bent the standoff - so I can't really blame the screw. Also bent the inner camber link screw - which I CAN blame on the screw. It just stretched and went loose. Didn't snap though!

Otherwise, like I say. The drawback with the high content titanium Mugen screws is they are soft. The heads want to strip sooner, (mostly 2mm - haven't stripped a 2.5 or 3mm) So, care must be taken.
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Old 10-02-2009, 09:09 AM   #9
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I'm in this bus. I light the whole car as much as I possibly can, and then take it to the minimum limit putting the weight where I want. My car is about 2.5oz less than Roar legal weight if I take out the weights. Done through the use of aluminum and titanium screws, titanium hardware, plastic/alum instead of alum/steel, and some other stuff, without! any noticeable reduction in strength, and I would now, I drive like shiat! LOL, but the acceleration is ridiculous, and gas mileage goes way up too, not to mention handling, which is the biggest improvement of all. But like 'star said the car WILL be quicker to react to your inputs but at the same time that will make your mistakes more noticeable too. I also like it because it pushes me more to learn how to drive, like when you drive an on road car vs an off road one, on road does not forgive as much as off road so you have to be more careful on what you tell your car to do.

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Old 10-02-2009, 09:18 AM   #10
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Titanium, either one, will bend before it breaks. Airplanes, bicycles ( full suspension without pivots) etc..

Personally, Id' go with Lunsford. Though expensive, they stand behind their products, which has more value than saving a few bucks up front.
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Old 10-02-2009, 09:40 AM   #11
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Aluminum screw are also nice in low load conditions, and anuminum loc nuts are another weight saver(xray allready uses aluminum locnuts).As well as aluminum hollow balls
Added up the hardware is probably the heaviest part of most cars(besides crown and spur gears), if your using the right screws in the right places there is huge gains to be made.
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Old 10-02-2009, 09:44 AM   #12
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The mugen Ti screws are excellent they're much much lighter than the stock screws and mugen doesn't make Ti screws for high stress areas (engine mount steering post)
Cost wise unless you're a Pro their not worth it, the only thing you will really gain is bragging rights at the track for having the lightest car lol
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Old 10-14-2009, 05:41 AM   #13
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I use a few of the Mugen Titanim screws from the MBX6 upper screw set on my car but they are in very low-stress areas that don't generally see dirt. I only used them for looks up top. Never use them when the screw is threading into aluminum or steel (basically places that you need to use loctite). They WILL strip when trying to remove them here. I also wouldn't recommend using them in high stress areas or places that get pounded (like under the chassis). At a good $1 or more a piece it just isn't worth the weight savings.

Today you can save a TON of more weight in other places. The newer truggy tires are super light. Titanium turnbuckles, aluminum drive line parts (although on the truggy's I would not recommend running the aluminum axles), aluminum steering posts, LiPo receiver packs, lightened cooling heads, lighter exhaust systems, and most importantly the body. I can't tell you much money peeps spend on lightening up their car yet they paint, back and decal up their bodies to weigh a good 3-4 oz's heavier than they should.....LOL
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Old 10-14-2009, 05:47 AM   #14
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I have run Ti screws, I will not buy them again. To me they are not worth the investment. Todays rides are lighter that ever before, and you needs some weight to keep the tires on the ground through high speed turns. There are some but few "lightened" parts that I run and will some what recommend.. Screws are not one of them.
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Old 10-14-2009, 06:27 AM   #15
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with all wheeled vehicles, RC car or real, rotating mass and unsprung mass is where you'll gain the most benefit.
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