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Old 09-25-2009, 07:46 PM   #1
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Default What does "Dry start" mean?

Hi everyone,

JUst got my first nitro buggy and im reading more on the engine. I have a nova rossi +4 and they mention something called a Dry start.. can someone explain to to me.. google isnt being much help either.

I been reading on actually how to start the car being that it would be the first time im starting a nitro buggy and im learning all that i can.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:06 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Moogumby View Post
Hi everyone,

JUst got my first nitro buggy and im reading more on the engine. I have a nova rossi +4 and they mention something called a Dry start.. can someone explain to to me.. google isnt being much help either.

I been reading on actually how to start the car being that it would be the first time im starting a nitro buggy and im learning all that i can.

In general, a dry start is what happens when your motor is new, you install it in the car right out of the box, and start it on the box without priming the motor, or lubing the motor before starting, you should always pull the motor appart and check for any machining debree that may have been overseen. If you have any afterun oil to dab on the cylnder wall's it is a good idea to do that, as well as on all the moving part's, crank pin, wrinstpin and bearing's, this will give some lubrication before the motor is started, once the motor is in the car, you can blow into the exaust stinger and it will push fuel right to the car so you not turning it over waiting for the pipe to prime the tank, once you have done this, the motor will fire almost instantly, then proceed with your breakin, hope this help's.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:15 PM   #3
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From my understanding and experience. Dry starting an engine is spinning it over without fuel, oil, or lubricant. NEVER try to start an engine dry. The result can include scoring your piston sleeve, and piston. Scoring your bearings and or inlet side of your crankshaft. If your engine is not lubricated / primed prior to starting your engine / dry. You can cause premature wear of the engine.

For a new engine / After tearing it down inspecting and cleaning it of any machining debris, and sealing it up. I add after run oil in the bearings and lubricate the internals. Then prime the engine with fuel, heat to 200 +/- 5 or 10 degrees. Then fire it for the first time. (Read the Break in sticky) at the top of this section.

With proper care from that point forward your mill should never be dry!!!
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Last edited by offr0aden; 09-25-2009 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:52 PM   #4
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Thanks guys for your answers!
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