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Old 08-31-2009, 05:34 AM   #1
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Default Standard vs. Turbo plug

Can someone really tell me what the biggest difference is between these plugs ? I am told turbos have a little more power and a little better fuel economy ? I can't understand why they would , Maybe one of you engine mod guys can explain. thanks
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Old 08-31-2009, 05:44 AM   #2
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I'm pretty sure it's because you get a more precise burn.
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Old 08-31-2009, 07:04 AM   #3
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Turbo plugs seal better, thus producing higher cylinder peak pressures, provided you don't ruin the taper sealing surface by running incorrect plugs that damage the tapered area. Most see differences though because the standard glowplug they use is not exactly the same as the turbo plug they use. Also, combustion chambers between standard and turbo buttons for each type of engine may or may not be the same shape or have the same cc volume. This is where you here mixed results with people running standard and turbo plugs. In theory, the turbo plug with better sealing will have the slightly higher power output, whether you notice it or not.
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Old 08-31-2009, 08:19 AM   #4
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This is a very common question and it is a very good question. I have tested this over and over and if you are comparing 2 plugs from the same company that have the same body and the same heat range, there really isn't a difference between the two. Perfect example, this past weekend we had a trophy race locally and a good friend of mine just purchased a race ported Novarossi P5XL from me. I modded it, broke it in and he ran for the first time on saturday. He wanted a standard plug version because he had a bunch of plugs in his tool box already that he wanted to use up. I already had a standard version I was using already so what I did was modded up a turbo version for him and and we switched combustion chambers after round #1 and in round #2, both engines ran the same as they did with the opposite chambers. This is about the 5th or 6th time I have tested this and the same result has occured. This is the important part, you have to test it apples for apples which means you have to run the exact opposite plug. We tested the Novarossi C6F long body versus the C6TF long body. If I were to change the heat range and or the type of plug, the results could be different. I hear the stories all the time about how the turbos make more power, are easier to tune etc. but yet, a few years ago, they were hard to tune and people hated them??? The plug technology hasn't changed much, but the engine designs have. What was good about this test was I was able to include another party in with the test and he also got to see first hand that there isn't much of a difference between plugs. All it is, is a coil that creates heat from current resistance and maintains heat between strokes due to the combustion cycle and depending on the heat range (thickness of the filiment) will determine when the mixture will fire based on compression ratio, heat in the cylinder and the flashpoint of the fuel. The hotter range plugs will fire sooner as the colder plugs will delay the ignition timing slightly as it takes longer for it to reach flashpoint allowing the engine to build a little more compression before it fires. The hotter plugs will be more likely to preignite causing damage from detonation if the compression ratio and tune isn't right. The colder plugs are more forgiving and therefore can be run with higher compression ratios and at leaner settings and still be safe. There are two ways to skin a cat so pick your poison. I personally run a med-cold plug as it allows me to run 30% fuel with 20% compression ratios and it also tends to run the same tune or very close to it with the changing air conditions. The hotter plugs will need more adjustments as conditions change to control preignition. I am sure you will get alot of different answers to this question but these have been my findings over years of building custom race engines and testing/racing under alot of different conditions.
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Old 08-31-2009, 08:39 AM   #5
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Thanks Mark ,
Thats kinda the point I was getting to , Once they are screwed in they really don't look all that different and they both seem to have the same components. Have you ever Dyno'd an engine with one and than the other ? thanks again . Jim
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Old 08-31-2009, 09:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PowerHouse View Post
This is a very common question and it is a very good question. I have tested this over and over and if you are comparing 2 plugs from the same company that have the same body and the same heat range, there really isn't a difference between the two. Perfect example, this past weekend we had a trophy race locally and a good friend of mine just purchased a race ported Novarossi P5XL from me. I modded it, broke it in and he ran for the first time on saturday. He wanted a standard plug version because he had a bunch of plugs in his tool box already that he wanted to use up. I already had a standard version I was using already so what I did was modded up a turbo version for him and and we switched combustion chambers after round #1 and in round #2, both engines ran the same as they did with the opposite chambers. This is about the 5th or 6th time I have tested this and the same result has occured. This is the important part, you have to test it apples for apples which means you have to run the exact opposite plug. We tested the Novarossi C6F long body versus the C6TF long body. If I were to change the heat range and or the type of plug, the results could be different. I hear the stories all the time about how the turbos make more power, are easier to tune etc. but yet, a few years ago, they were hard to tune and people hated them??? The plug technology hasn't changed much, but the engine designs have. What was good about this test was I was able to include another party in with the test and he also got to see first hand that there isn't much of a difference between plugs. All it is, is a coil that creates heat from current resistance and maintains heat between strokes due to the combustion cycle and depending on the heat range (thickness of the filiment) will determine when the mixture will fire based on compression ratio, heat in the cylinder and the flashpoint of the fuel. The hotter range plugs will fire sooner as the colder plugs will delay the ignition timing slightly as it takes longer for it to reach flashpoint allowing the engine to build a little more compression before it fires. The hotter plugs will be more likely to preignite causing damage from detonation if the compression ratio and tune isn't right. The colder plugs are more forgiving and therefore can be run with higher compression ratios and at leaner settings and still be safe. There are two ways to skin a cat so pick your poison. I personally run a med-cold plug as it allows me to run 30% fuel with 20% compression ratios and it also tends to run the same tune or very close to it with the changing air conditions. The hotter plugs will need more adjustments as conditions change to control preignition. I am sure you will get alot of different answers to this question but these have been my findings over years of building custom race engines and testing/racing under alot of different conditions.
I agree. I haven't seen any difference between the two. I only swap heads to use a specific plug I have or can get in most cases, other than that, I just run either one.
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Old 08-31-2009, 09:26 AM   #7
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Haven't dynoed back to back testing the turbo vs. standard plug as a sinple field test will give you that answer. I don't have a dyno and I used to send the engines out west to get tested and after mulitiple passes on different designs and ideas, I got what I needed out of it. I was considering getting a dyno but after much debate and input from customers, they indicated to me that they don't care about numbers, just how it performs in the field and I agree with that through and through. A dyno is nice tool to have and in other forms of racing, it is a necessity, but in the world of radio control cars, it is an investment that doesn't get much on the return as far as people spending money to get their engine dynoed. I asked multiple people who kept badgering me on why I don't have numbers to back my work but these are the same people who wouldn't spend a dime to get the numbers so why should I spend my money on something they wouldn't spend their money on. I have a great customer base and never once did any of them require dyno sheets before purchase and I haven't had a dissatisfied customer that I know of and belive me, in this world, if someone has something to say, they will say it whether you want to hear it or not. That can be good but also bad depending on which end of the spectrum you are on.
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