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Old 01-09-2009, 11:10 AM   #1
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Default Practice on a race motor?

I recently picked up a nice RC8 with a RB C6BB. This is my first nitro buggy. Alas, I have a good amount of learning and praticing to do. My questions are:

Should I practice on this motor or get a cheaper one to learn on?

Can I just use this motor then rebuild it later with a rebuild kit? (like $169)

I figured the rebuild kit is cheaper then a new motor so I could just keep on going with the C6 then just rebuild it later?

Also, people say engines get so many gallons before they are done, but how long does a gallon usually last? Like how many tanks i guess.

Thanks
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:16 AM   #2
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Run it have fun. Life of the engine depends on tuning and how you take care of it..
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:20 AM   #3
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I would throw a $99 Go-Tech 3-port in there, it will be plenty fast enough to practice and race on. If you're a newb, it honestly doesn't matter what motor you have. Only the top level drivers max out the performance of a top of the line motor. It's like saying that you just bought a new Suzuki GSXR 1000, and you're a new rider. Are you going to max out the performance? Could you be just as fast a beginner on an SV-650? Absolutely because the speed of the motor is not the limiting factor, your skill is.
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:55 AM   #4
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i would probably save that c6 for later.. get you a nova t21bf and run the pi$$ out of it.. they are easy to tune and very cheap
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:56 AM   #5
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i would probably save that c6 for later.. get you a nova t21bf and run the pi$$ out of it.. they are easy to tune and very cheap
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Old 01-09-2009, 11:58 AM   #6
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I gotta disagree with the wisdom behind race and practice motors. Unless both of your motors are the same, in his case 2 c6's. You won't be able to learn how to control a serious performance motor like the c6 while running a motor that has substantially less performance. To use the analogy of the smaller motorcycle vs a bike like the gsxr1000. Imagine that you are competing in a superbike race for the first time, and your team gives you a moderate performance type bike, not really a bike that you would race. You go out during practice and just wring that thing out. You find that bikes edge and ride on it. You feel like the greatest rider ever. Now, time for the race, and they bring you Mat Mladin's GSXR 1000! You have never been on a bike like that 200+ horsepower, indeed a scary ride. The first time you come out of a corner and lay into the power of that thing, and the rear end comes out from under you, and you high center. Sound like fun?
May be a little long of an analogy, but you get the idea.

Run the c6, and then rebuild it as needed.

I have a c6 BBT L2g in my 8b by the way, and love it.
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:13 PM   #7
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Slower car / bike will teach corner speed and late braking. A fast motor will teach nothing more than blasting it down the straights, going slowly through the turns, and then getting on the gas again. Racing underpowered is perhaps one of the best things one can do for them self. The best racers will work their way from slower classes that help them build their skills, like I said corner speed and late braking are never learned with vehicles that extremely fast in a straight line. That's why those who race in MotoGP generally start in the smaller GP classes, so they learn the finesse it takes, once they graduate to full power they have the complete package.
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:18 PM   #8
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Slower car / bike will teach corner speed and late braking. A fast motor will teach nothing more than blasting it down the straights, going slowly through the turns, and then getting on the gas again. Racing underpowered is perhaps one of the best things one can do for them self. The best racers will work their way from slower classes that help them build their skills, like I said corner speed and late braking are never learned with vehicles that extremely fast in a straight line. That's why those who race in MotoGP generally start in the smaller GP classes, so they learn the finesse it takes, once they graduate to full power they have the complete package.
You are exactly right. But if you do step up to Moto gp without ever practicing on your moto gp bike, you will never learn to ride it. Practicing on a slower bike / motor, and then racing on the race bike just gets you crashed. Maybe a good idea for him to learn how to drive the buggy on a slower motor, but he needs to practice on the c6 in order to be able to control it while racing.
I guess I could have been a little more explanatory. sorry for any confusion.
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:19 PM   #9
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Stick with the C6 mate imo. If you're not a complete novice to racing (be it electric onroad/offroad/nitro onroad) you'll pick it up soon enough. Then again if you've just started get a cheap engine to ring the neck out of whilst your learning to tune and get the overall basic feel of nitro engines
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:21 PM   #10
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You also have to think about tuning. If you are inexperienced at tuning you may want to save the good "race" motor for when you get some experience. I would say to do what rearviewmirror said. get yourself a go 3 port and learn with that. Those little motors have plenty of power and can last a long time. Or get the novarossi limited edition 3 port. you can get them for $150 and you get novarossi quality. If it was just a question of having a practice motor I would say no but a learning motor might be a good thing.

That is if you don't have any tuning experience. if you do go ahead and run the c6.
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:28 PM   #11
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+1 Jammin

If you are brand new to the hobby and still learning the ins and outs of racing and tuning get you a cheap motor to run. With a new cheaper motor you will be able to learn the break-in process, how to tune, and how to drive with mild power. Then once you get a grasp on what to do then start working with your C6. The reasoning behind this is if you happen to forget to charge your rx pack and the car runs away and the motor blows you learn a $100 lesson not a minimum of a $200 lesson. $200 for p/s/r and bearings.

A C6 is alot of motor for a new racer to wrangle right out of the gate. I highly reccomend get a practice/breakin motor. Plus it never hurts to have a backup. Which the GO 3port will be once you get use to the C6.
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:29 PM   #12
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im not fast, but i think you should practice with what your going to run.. power makes a diffference on how my truck performs forsure. if you want to save that engine ,thats one thing. but if your going to learn with a cheaper engine.. race that cheaper engine as well.. then throw in some power later
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:31 PM   #13
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Ideally I'd like to learn with the C6 and just rebuild it when need be. BUT, my quarrel is, when I rebuild it will it perform like a new engine?

I've seen the rebuild kits for $169 and could probably get one a tad cheaper if I searched around enough. It comes with the piston, rod, sleeve, and some clips I think. What's the general lowdown on rebuilding engines?
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:39 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wick3dr00st3r View Post
Ideally I'd like to learn with the C6 and just rebuild it when need be. BUT, my quarrel is, when I rebuild it will it perform like a new engine?

I've seen the rebuild kits for $169 and could probably get one a tad cheaper if I searched around enough. It comes with the piston, rod, sleeve, and some clips I think. What's the general lowdown on rebuilding engines?
You would also have to tack on bearings which are atleast $50. plus you would have to make sure the crankshaft pin is not morn out. if it is that would be another 100 atleast. also you would want to make sure all the rubber o-rings and seals are good. You would have to check the head button for pitting. in most cases rebuilding an engine is far from worth it. The total will probably come close to the price of a brand new motor.

I agree with BigAlz that you should practice with the motor that you are gonna race with, but I also believe it would be beneficial to have a learning/backup motor. Once you get the feel for tuning etc. put the c6 in and run that for practice and racing. Before that time comes just run the cheaper motor for everything.
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Old 01-09-2009, 12:44 PM   #15
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Wow! Thanks for all the fast responses! I was writing my previous then got all this good advice after I replied. I think getting the Go Tech, may be a good choice.

I'm not new to RC racing but I'm not great at it. I used to race my XX-CR in 96'-97' when I was kid, then chicks became a little more important, lol.Then I joined the Military. Now I'm getting back into it, but have NO experience with nitro.

You guys sound right on, It might be best for me to learn the in's and out's on a cheaper mil then the expensive one.
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