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Old 10-29-2008, 08:31 AM   #1
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Default Truggy ride heigth and droop

What is a good starting point for front and rear ride heigths, and front and rear droop? I'm running a Kyosho ST-RR conversion with TQ's big bore shocks.
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Old 10-29-2008, 10:20 AM   #2
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Ride height: Arms level all the way around
Diffs: 7-10-3
Shock oil: F-80 R-70 Losi oil (Kyosho) Blue springs all the way around.
Brake bias: R 70-80% F 20-30%
Tires: Gators soft, stock foams, LPR wheels
I will check ride height later and post it.

This setup is the easiest I have found to drive. My truck is a St-rr out of the box- not a conversion

Last edited by mracer; 10-29-2008 at 04:40 PM.
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Old 10-29-2008, 12:01 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mracer View Post
Ride height: Arms level all the way around
Diffs: 7-10-3
Shock oil: F-80 R-70 Losi oil Blue springs all the way around.
Brake bias: R 70-80% F 20-30%
Tires: Gators soft, stock foams, LPR wheels
I will check ride height later and post it.

This setup is the easiest I have found to drive. My truck is a St-rr out of the box- not a conversion
+1 The only thing I wouldn't do is run gators at first... Try M3 Bowties.
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Old 10-29-2008, 02:56 PM   #4
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Interesting...what is R-80 & F-70 oil? I'm used to 35wt -45wt shock oils. Also, how do you set brake bias to get a %? Has anyone tried the Jammin springs on the TQ shocks?
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Old 10-29-2008, 04:22 PM   #5
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Quote:
Interesting...what is R-80 & F-70 oil?
R-80 = "Rear" 80 wt
F-70 = "Front" 70 wt
As for brakes you need to adjust your collars on the brake linkage so that the rear grab first than the front so that you don't push through the corner when braking hard. If your front brakes grab to hard you will lose most to all steering when you hit the brakes coming into a corner. Hope that helps and is what Mracer is meaning.
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Old 10-29-2008, 04:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honda_stuntboy View Post
R-80 = "Rear" 80 wt
F-70 = "Front" 70 wt
As for brakes you need to adjust your collars on the brake linkage so that the rear grab first than the front so that you don't push through the corner when braking hard. If your front brakes grab to hard you will lose most to all steering when you hit the brakes coming into a corner. Hope that helps and is what Mracer is meaning.
That is it exactly. Sorry I was not clear. The % is just a guesstimation. With the truck shut off and electrics on, roll it on the ground and ease in the brakes. The rear should grab and stop first. Then the front should start to drag. Like honda_stuntboy said I don't like for my front to lock up. You lose the ability to steer the vehicle.

Droop on my truck:
*With the vehicle on the stand, using a caliper, measure from the center of the top bolt on the shock to the center of the pin on the bottom (mounting pin and bolt) You are measuring your shocks as a means of finding how far down your arms are traveling.
*Shock mounting position will need to be the same for this to be effective.

Front shock mounting postion: From the center of the truck out, I use the second to the last hole, top and bottom. My shock measures 123 mm

Rear shock mounting postion: From the center of the truck out, I use the second to the last hole in the top section of the shock tower. On the bottom I use the center hole on the arm. My shock measures 124 mm. You may want your shocks to be in different places, but you can temporarily mount them in the same hole to get the droop set.
If you have anymore questions, post them. I hope this gives you a good starting point. Once you get that truck set up how YOU want it, you will love it!

Last edited by mracer; 10-29-2008 at 07:38 PM.
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Old 10-30-2008, 09:07 AM   #7
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Thanks guys, great info! Mracer, I've never heard of anyone running such heavy shock oils as 70 & 80 on a truggy...wow. If I understand correctly then droop is really controlled by the length of the assembled shock? I thought that you unhooked the shock then measured the free-fall distance of the arm relative to the chassis plane. The truggy has those set screws to adjust the arm travel. What effect does tinkering with the droop have on the handling, if any? Does it just effect jumping? You guys have been a great help, as I'm just starting to drive good enough to begin thinking about these kinds of adjustments to my truggy. Any other advice???
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Old 10-30-2008, 04:57 PM   #8
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The droop screws are what you use to set the droop with. You are measuring the shocks to get a precise measurement of the screws adjustment. (Sounds complicated, but it is not after you mess with it). I do not want the shocks on my truck extending all the way. I think they do that some in 1/10th scale stuff, but I avoid it in these vehicles.

*Shock oils are dependant on outside temps, shock pistons, vehicle, track conditions and the way you drive.

With a lot of this stuff you are going to have to start off somewhere and work from there. That is what I did.

Hope all of this helps.
Mike

Last edited by mracer; 10-30-2008 at 05:20 PM.
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Old 10-30-2008, 05:05 PM   #9
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Another way to do it is take off your wheels/tires, set the vehicle on a couple of wheels(with no tires on them) and measure the distance from the table to the threaded part of the hub:

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