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Old 01-31-2017, 04:39 AM   #46
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Just like all of you I have seen the clubs rise and fall. I have seen classes rise and fall. The only thing that I know that helps sustain a class or club is the help new racers get from experienced racers including how they are treated on the racing surface. There isn't a magic class but slower speeds help newbies. A spec class is also a good entry point but make sure that the racers have help when needed including driving coaching.
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Old 01-31-2017, 04:49 AM   #47
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THIS!

I started in VTA and it was fun, I like the look of the cars and a spec tire, but long time fast guys were lapping me like 4-5 times. Its not their fault they're fast, I knew I was slow and struggling with setup, tire prep, etc. A rookie class with a spec car with no seasoned drivers would be real nice, simplify the setup. But then when you're ready to graduate to a faster class, u need a new chassis and possibly all electronics.... But.. I think it is an ok idea to get your feet wet for less $ especially since some n00bs don't stick with it and bail. You could point potential new racers to Tower Hobbies and say buy these items, build it and go.

Local track is considering a spec class with the Tamiya Team Hahn semi trucks, that would be fun and a good way to get started. And its a TT01 so you could do some other classes with it later.

Friendly and helpful racers and track owner helped me feel welcome, that is a necessity. Another track people with put a towel on their car as you walk buy and say "don't steal my ideas". Brrrrrr.......
We started a box stock class last fall using the tamiya hahn semi tt01 and the kits flew of the shelf, rookies and veterans alike were buying them up. Now the problem is getting over half of those who bought one to show up and actually race it. Strictly stock classes are a nice cheap venture into road racing. And if it doesn't work out for newcomers they still have a nice hobbygrade vehicle to muck about wiith in the driveway. Friendly racers also bring new faces. Not everyone wants to give up their secrets which is fine. But doling out some handling or setup tips to new racers shows sportsmanship and comeraderie that will encourage them to race more and hone their skills to become better.
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Old 01-31-2017, 06:04 AM   #48
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A thought...
New drivers just simply and innocently don't know track etiquette. Teach them ahead of time so they don't have to learn on the stand when tensions are high.
That makes everyone happy, new racers feel more accepted in the house and seasoned racers have more confidence their cars are not going to get smashed.

#1 tracks are a business that have bills to pay.
#2 seasoned racers want a track to last into the future.
#3 newbies are future investments.
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Old 01-31-2017, 06:27 AM   #49
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I believe Europe does a good thing with the ets. They run spec esc's, motors, and tires. I understand the draw of running whichever brand you want, but I think a true spec class with designated batteries (and charging rules), esc, and locked timing motor would be simple and easy for someone to get in to. I see a lot of threads started on this site asking about the best motor or esc, etc. Making a true spec class would make getting in to the hobby much less intimidating.

Echoing what was said earlier, having the track crew do an orientation and track etiquette briefing for people on their first visit would set the rules from the start. This eliminates a lot of problems down the road. It's good to give this briefing to seasoned racers as well to remind them about sometimes forgotten manners.
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Old 01-31-2017, 06:29 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by gmackhurry View Post
A thought...
New drivers just simply and innocently don't know track etiquette. Teach them ahead of time so they don't have to learn on the stand when tensions are high.
That makes everyone happy, new racers feel more accepted in the house and seasoned racers have more confidence their cars are not going to get smashed.

#1 tracks are a business that have bills to pay.
#2 seasoned racers want a track to last into the future.
#3 newbies are future investments.
To be honest, when I've seen poor track etiquette it's not usually the rookies.
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Old 01-31-2017, 07:14 AM   #51
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To be honest, when I've seen poor track etiquette it's not usually the rookies.
I believe it.
I also witnessed plenty of seasoned drivers get nasty on the track.
I'll bet a good portion of it is because they are tired of new guys not not knowing how things roll, not letting the leader pass, running them up to the corner, stopping in the straight, racing while qualifying, etc...

If the newbies were constantly advised how it works so they know not to form these bad habits then everyone would be more happy. And maybe a few seasoned drivers would relax and not be so brutal also.
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Old 02-01-2017, 04:38 AM   #52
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You need to change the mindset of the average rc buyer. And those that have been in hobby and stayed away from racing. Took 6 years for me to try.
Focus on just getting people to the track. To running in a track format. For most running with other vehicles is different. Most don't. Run solo, with few friends or kids. I did my first and only race over summer. Was good with the track layout and speed. But I'd never driven a touring car with other cars till that point.
Maybe a track day style event. Works for real race track.
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Old 02-01-2017, 10:23 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmackhurry View Post
I believe it.
I also witnessed plenty of seasoned drivers get nasty on the track.
I'll bet a good portion of it is because they are tired of new guys not not knowing how things roll, not letting the leader pass, running them up to the corner, stopping in the straight, racing while qualifying, etc...

If the newbies were constantly advised how it works so they know not to form these bad habits then everyone would be more happy. And maybe a few seasoned drivers would relax and not be so brutal also.
If the seasoned drivers is as good and as fast as the thing they are go around the new driver without anyone crashing. you can still maintain your lap time that way because if an crash occur as a result of them trying to get out of your way, then your lap time will be slower.
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Old 02-01-2017, 11:42 AM   #54
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If the seasoned drivers is as good and as fast as the thing they are go around the new driver without anyone crashing. you can still maintain your lap time that way because if an crash occur as a result of them trying to get out of your way, then your lap time will be slower.
Yeah good point. You can have quite a pile up in that case.
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Old 02-03-2017, 09:40 AM   #55
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As a newb, it's easier if you just pass me like you would the position ahead of you.

Getting out of the way is harder than it looks. You swing off line, then when you get back online the next place slams into you because your off your rythm and lack the skill to get back inline smoothly.
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Old 02-03-2017, 10:03 AM   #56
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at a race i attended last weekend...they dealt with one of my issues with rc car racing in general, the ifmar start for qualifying... the race director still had everyone on ifmar qualifying (each car on its own clock) but we gridded for every heat as if it was the main.....and they did an f1 staggered grid, not bumper to bumper....
it was great for the specators who usually are confused with ifmar qualifying....
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Old 02-03-2017, 11:07 AM   #57
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You need to change the mindset of the average rc buyer. And those that have been in hobby and stayed away from racing. Took 6 years for me to try.
Focus on just getting people to the track. To running in a track format. For most running with other vehicles is different. Most don't. Run solo, with few friends or kids. I did my first and only race over summer. Was good with the track layout and speed. But I'd never driven a touring car with other cars till that point.
Maybe a track day style event. Works for real race track.
This, SO much.

I used to race 1/12 carpet oval over 25 years ago. And got back into R/C last year, manly off-road bashing. This past December I discovered my local club and am now being tempted to try my hand at modern, organized On-road racing. So far I have only attended a few open practice sessions and hung out with local club members.
They were all very inclusive, friendly folks and a couple of guys let me hot lap their cars to test and see what class I would want to run.
So far the only prohibitive/intimidating thing for me is the fact there is not really a truly entry level stock class.
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Old 02-03-2017, 01:22 PM   #58
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I see a ton of excellent points posted here. As a track/store owner, who's been racing for 30 years, I have definitely seen the ebb and flow of various classes, as well as changes in racers' expectations of how the program should be run. We have a fair mix of classes running here currently. SCT, 12th scale 17.5 and 13.5, a plastic chassis "sport" TC class (TT cars and Vaterras mostly). We'll generally run any class in which we have four drivers.

Keep the ideas flowing guys! This is very informative.
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Old 02-03-2017, 02:06 PM   #59
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First thing for everyone to remember is that most of are grown men playing with toy cars!!! Many seem to forget about this. Everyone wants to be competitive and win but seem to forget that this is a hobby and we are doing this for the enjoyment of competitiveness as well as the camaraderie with our fellow racers (buddies). Egos should be checked at the door and picked up when leaving. Have fun and try to mentor the kids and new people when you can. Personally, I would rather be competitive in a large growing class that master of a small dying class.

Remember, we contribute to the success or failure of r/c racing in our area sometimes more than the economy, etc. Try to support your local hobby shops, especially the ones that have or sponsor tracks. Try not to be the source of contention at your track; be the plethora of information and helpfulness. Most of all, try to work together to make everyone's experience at the track a good one so that they want to come back again and again. Lastly, if you can help out the track owner with time, money, some labor, or a combination thereof, please step to the plate. Any help would be appreciated and might be rewarded by the shop/track owners that you are helping to relieve some of the burden.
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Old 02-03-2017, 02:23 PM   #60
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A 'seasoned racer' as I have seen them described in the last few posts SHOULD know when to slow down, when to pass, how to negotiate heavy traffic, who to avoid, who to pass on the inside, who they can air pass, how to avoid getting collected in big pile ups, etc.

Problem is, do we see that from the seasoned racers on the track? I was sweeping the track last week while an "SR" was practicing. Why he was practicing while I was sweeping for the next round I'm not sure. The dude almost hit me in the head while I was sweeping the big jump section. He said "whoa I didn't see you". He ran lots of laps whilst I was sweeping. He knew I was on the track. Didn't see me when sweeping the big jump section. - That's a seasoned racer for ya. If he almost hit me, how is he going to avoid anything smaller on the track?

Lots of us think we are better than we are. Guys think they are awesome, but are totally driving out of control. Then they blame the new guy. Intelligence is not something we see so much of on the RC race track
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