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Old 01-21-2015, 06:52 PM   #16
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It's possible to 3D print a rim with at least the same performance as a injection molded rim.
The problem is costs at the moment, a set will come in at around $200.

Two months ago I purchased my own, professional (SLA) 3D printer to speed up prototyping.
To calibrate (roundness) it I printed a RC rim:



The small flashings are from the supports which are needed during printing.

Because 3D printing gives complete freeness in terms of design I'm pretty sure you can design a rim which is much lighter but still has the strength to be used.
Thank you for posting this. While the performance of this rim is not proven, you have firmly established that it's possible to print a rim even if it's expensive.
When you say that it cost about $200 to print a set, is that from hiring a printing service or is that the price to print it yourself on your own machine?
Also how did you acquire the stl file of the rim? Did you scan it or is it your own design?
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Old 01-21-2015, 07:54 PM   #17
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We use a 3D printer at work and whilst I haven't made a rim we have made similar shapes.

ABS and PLA are the most common printing filament but you can get other materials such as nylon.
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Old 01-22-2015, 05:52 AM   #18
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There are quite a few SLA machines on the market. Parts can be made in metal if you have the bucks and time. I have even seen machines that work in wood and paper. They are not printers but lasers that slice the profile out of thin sheets that are laminated. Those parts are very strong. SLA machines are the additive method. There are also multi-axis bench top mills that work off of the same types of files. My dentist has one of those. He takes a 3-d image of the mouth before he preps it for a crown. Then he does his thing preparing for it and shoots another image. The software then creates the model and the mill cuts the ceramic replacement. All in about 20 minutes and $800.
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:06 AM   #19
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There are quite a few SLA machines on the market. Parts can be made in metal if you have the bucks and time. I have even seen machines that work in wood and paper. They are not printers but lasers that slice the profile out of thin sheets that are laminated. Those parts are very strong. SLA machines are the additive method. There are also multi-axis bench top mills that work off of the same types of files. My dentist has one of those. He takes a 3-d image of the mouth before he preps it for a crown. Then he does his thing preparing for it and shoots another image. The software then creates the model and the mill cuts the ceramic replacement. All in about 20 minutes and $800.
I have a crown/inlay made the same way. I never thought about those mills being used for non dental purposes. Maybe I wrote off the idea considering the price of the machine to be out of reach. Good post. Thank you.
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:21 AM   #20
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No it can't. I own Pro One Tires www.facebook.com/proonerc

Making wheels is more difficult than you think. There are many factors other than designing a cool wheel. The plastic used with 3D printing will not hold up. I have experience with 3D printers while working at my job (Microsoft).
Our wheels are injection molded with specific materials that hold up to the beating they take, the gluing process and mounting.

Steve
They absolutely will. I can get them printed in a stronger material than the RPM plastic. I have made 1/8th bulk heads out of this stuff.
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Old 01-22-2015, 01:18 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by snoopyrc View Post
Thank you for posting this. While the performance of this rim is not proven, you have firmly established that it's possible to print a rim even if it's expensive.
When you say that it cost about $200 to print a set, is that from hiring a printing service or is that the price to print it yourself on your own machine?
Also how did you acquire the stl file of the rim? Did you scan it or is it your own design?
$200 is for outsourcing the printing with a company who specializes in high end 3D printing, or most professionals call it 'Additive manufacturing'.

Printing it on my own machine it's $4,20 for one rim.

The rim is a design I made myself, and then exported to STL to print.

3D scanning is also a nice tool, I had a couple 200mm sedans scanned in order to do some research.

Protoform SRS:



Then scaled it down 3 times and printed it:



Forgot to increase the thickness of the rear wing so that unfortunately broke during cleaning.

Both techniques are really improving rapidly and prices are coming down rapidly as well, making it possible for us hobbyists to own such awesome tools.
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Old 01-22-2015, 02:56 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DS Motorsport View Post
It's possible to 3D print a rim with at least the same performance as a injection molded rim.
The problem is costs at the moment, a set will come in at around $200.

Two months ago I purchased my own, professional (SLA) 3D printer to speed up prototyping.
To calibrate (roundness) it I printed a RC rim:



The small flashings are from the supports which are needed during printing.

Because 3D printing gives complete freeness in terms of design I'm pretty sure you can design a rim which is much lighter but still has the strength to be used.
What is the diameter of that wheel?

Off topic, I have the HDR 170's and love them.
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Old 01-22-2015, 03:33 PM   #23
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I guess those bodies had to be scaled down in order be be small enough to print. I don't think any of the makerbot style printers will do a full sized shell, but some smaller parts are probably no problem. I know CEFX actually had a touring wing for sale that was printed. The USGT guys and even some of the US Vintage Trans Am guys would love some dashboards, seats and other interior parts especially if they could be accurate to their particular car. Head and tail light buckets would be great.

DS Motorsport are you using autocad, 3DS Max, or something more friendly?
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Old 01-22-2015, 05:40 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopyrc View Post
I guess those bodies had to be scaled down in order be be small enough to print. I don't think any of the makerbot style printers will do a full sized shell, but some smaller parts are probably no problem. I know CEFX actually had a touring wing for sale that was printed. The USGT guys and even some of the US Vintage Trans Am guys would love some dashboards, seats and other interior parts especially if they could be accurate to their particular car. Head and tail light buckets would be great.

DS Motorsport are you using autocad, 3DS Max, or something more friendly?
You can export your model from most 3d programs into the STL format used by printers.
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Old 01-22-2015, 07:25 PM   #25
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Post a picture or links of the wheels that you are trying to duplicate and maybe someone has seen them in 1:10 scale in the past. I recently found some 1:10 Firebird Bandit style wheels online, which surprised me. Maybe the wheels you want exist already.




I basically want more options in wheels of VTA dimensions, and now that USGT is on 24mm tires, the options are limited there as well unless you stretch the tire to a 26mm wheel.
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Old 01-22-2015, 10:05 PM   #26
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Pretty close. http://www.hpiracing.com/en/part/3860



Saw some of these few weeks ago at our local track. They looked really good.
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Old 01-24-2015, 02:17 AM   #27
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We have a $500K Objet printer at work that can produce what they call a Digital Material that mixes 2 different resins to create various factors of rigidity like rubber, ABS or Nylon and it is an actual printer as it lays down something like 18 micron thick layers at a time via an inkjet like print head. Unfortunately the resin is too costly for any kind of production @ $1000 per pound. It's really sweet though. : So the answer to the OP is that it is currently possible to print usable parts but the machines and materials to make them strong and light enough is too cost prohibitive. Machining or molding is the only viable option at this time. 1 off prototypes are a different story though... This machine is big enough and sophisticated enough to print an entire RC car, rubber tires and all, at the same time, fully assembled. You would be crazy to do it but it's possible.
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Old 01-24-2015, 09:47 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Odin544 View Post
What is the diameter of that wheel?

Off topic, I have the HDR 170's and love them.
50mm, it's a rim for a foam tire.
When the season starts again overhere I might print a set and mount some foam on them. Just to try.

Yes, the HDR 160 are really nice. Use them all the time when working on my cars.
Also have a 280 Pro, those are even better but not really comfortable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopyrc View Post
I guess those bodies had to be scaled down in order be be small enough to print. I don't think any of the makerbot style printers will do a full sized shell, but some smaller parts are probably no problem. I know CEFX actually had a touring wing for sale that was printed. The USGT guys and even some of the US Vintage Trans Am guys would love some dashboards, seats and other interior parts especially if they could be accurate to their particular car. Head and tail light buckets would be great.

DS Motorsport are you using autocad, 3DS Max, or something more friendly?
A colleague of my has build a extrusion-style printer which could print a fullsize 1/10 bodyshell. Only the resolution and accuracy could use some improvement.

I mainly bought the printer to speed up prototyping for a new RC company I started, P1-RC.com, and print one-off aero parts to see if I can improve the aero package on my nitro car.

I use Solidworks, Inventor and Pro/E. Prefer working with Solidworks though as that's the fastest and easiest program to work with.
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Old 01-25-2015, 03:49 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by DS Motorsport View Post
A colleague of my has build a extrusion-style printer which could print a fullsize 1/10 bodyshell. Only the resolution and accuracy could use some improvement.
The guys that build their own 3D printer amaze me. I guess if I could, I would build my own as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DS Motorsport View Post
I mainly bought the printer to speed up prototyping for a new RC company I started, P1-RC.com, and print one-off aero parts to see if I can improve the aero package on my nitro car.

I use Solidworks, Inventor and Pro/E. Prefer working with Solidworks though as that's the fastest and easiest program to work with.
Thanks again for your post. I am looking forward to seeing what you do with your company. I'm also excited to see what 3D printing will do for RC. With the possibility of one off wheels or light buckets, maybe some custom interior pieces might be possible.
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Old 01-25-2015, 04:09 PM   #30
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This is a very interesting thread. I have always wondered about the use of 3d printers for keeping vintage cars running when parts become difficult or near impossible to find (or at least find at a reasonable price). How much more fun would it be to drive my old Tamiya FF01 if I didn't have to worry about breaking the front suspension mount or motor housing? I can see in a few years the printers being commonplace and the materials being cheap enough to make this feasible.
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