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Old 10-22-2014, 07:39 AM   #1
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Default blind hole bearing puller

Does anyone know of a tool at will allow me to pull the bearing out of a motor end plate that does not have a through hole? The bearing bore is blind so I can not get to the back side to tap it out. The id of the bearing is 1/8".
If not a tool made for that purpose, any ideas how to get it out would be great.
I already tried using a pick and heating up the aluminum plate. That got me no where.
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Old 10-22-2014, 07:50 AM   #2
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You could try an Allen wrench with the elbow part touching the face of the bearing and the end prying behind it. Or the right size flathead screwdriver and pry back and forth.
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Old 10-22-2014, 08:12 AM   #3
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Sounds like you've got a situation here. Generally a pick behind the bearing will work, moving from side to side to wiggle the bearing out. But obviously this hasn't. And, since you've even tried heat, well that's tough.

- I'd start by taking a 1/8 pin in the bearing ID and using that to wiggle the sucker back and forth. With heat I'd think this would be the best bet.

- You could try prying off the bearing seal and getting a pick in the ball area of the bearing to give you a little more leverage. You can also try destroying the bearing to give you access to the outer race. I would not go this route immediately.

- You could try some expanding pliers (like maybe some snap ring pliers if you have a pair laying around) to grab the bearing ID. With only 1/8 to work with though this may be tough.

- You could possible use a cutter on a dremel tool to cut a slot in the bearing and smack it around in a circle with a chisel or flat head to loosen it up

- You could epoxy a tool to the bearing and use that to pull it out. Obviously being careful with the epoxy. Not really that great of an idea...

- As a last resort you could drill a hole in the opposite side and access the bearing from there.
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Old 10-22-2014, 10:04 AM   #4
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I pull out pilot bearings from flywheels/crankshafts this way.

Stuff as much grease as possible in the bearing. Get an old motor shaft that is a very snug fit inside the bearing and has a flat end and give it a serious whack square down the bearing hole. The bearing should pop out.

There are two crucial points here.

The shaft used has to be very snug inside the bearing.

The space inside the bearing (and behind it if there is any) has to be absolutely full of grease and the hole of the bearing too, fill until flush with the exposed bearing face.

If you don't achieve these two key goals, the system doesn't work because you won't create the hydraulic pressure behind the bearing to push it out.

If you do, the bearing will pop out. It may come out a little bit first. If that happens, take the shaft out, put some more grease in to fill the space created, and repeat the procedure.

The grease might pop through the bearing seals. Don't worry, fill up the space again and whack harder.

Keep in mind, what you're doing is using a piston (the old motor shaft) down a cylinder (the bearing inner hole). That is all the pressure you have, and that is why the hole has to be full of grease.

I have managed to pull bearings frozen in rusty old flywheels this way.
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Old 10-22-2014, 10:06 AM   #5
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that's a great suggestion
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Old 10-22-2014, 10:49 AM   #6
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I've used this trick to remove pilot bearings from crankshafts, no reason to think it couldn't work here. Great idea indeed.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:19 AM   #7
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I like it.
I will give that a try.
Thanks.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:21 AM   #8
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All these ideas are OFF....... A lot of manufacturers use CA glue to fit their bearings inside the backplate, so you will need to soak the whole plate in Acetone first, and then heat the plate up to take out the bearing... It should come out easily with an Allen wrench... After the acetone, I also use some liquid wrench to further loosen the bearing. Avoid the methods that suggest destroying the bearing or hitting with a hammer!!! You don't want to bend anything.....
Only BERT KNOWS!!!LOL!!!!!! I've pulled many Novak Ballistic backplate bearings out that way...... One of them was so stuck that I had to repeat the process several times, and had to heat the black backplate until it turned brown to get the bearing out....
Another technique is to use bread instead of grease through the bearing inner race hole and cram it up in there real good with a tight shaft, but you'll still need to use acetone&heat first...
Lastly, you can use a can of freeze spray after the acetone&heat to freeze the bearing quickly while the case is still hot. The bearing should pop out...

Last edited by bertrandsv87; 10-22-2014 at 12:33 PM.
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Old 10-22-2014, 05:09 PM   #9
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I did the drill a hole in the backplate and used my bearing puller to remove it. Then when replaced I placed a sticker over the hole.
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Old 10-22-2014, 05:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by niznai View Post
I pull out pilot bearings from flywheels/crankshafts this way.

Stuff as much grease as possible in the bearing. Get an old motor shaft that is a very snug fit inside the bearing and has a flat end and give it a serious whack square down the bearing hole. The bearing should pop out.

There are two crucial points here.

The shaft used has to be very snug inside the bearing.

The space inside the bearing (and behind it if there is any) has to be absolutely full of grease and the hole of the bearing too, fill until flush with the exposed bearing face.

If you don't achieve these two key goals, the system doesn't work because you won't create the hydraulic pressure behind the bearing to push it out.

If you do, the bearing will pop out. It may come out a little bit first. If that happens, take the shaft out, put some more grease in to fill the space created, and repeat the procedure.

The grease might pop through the bearing seals. Don't worry, fill up the space again and whack harder.

Keep in mind, what you're doing is using a piston (the old motor shaft) down a cylinder (the bearing inner hole). That is all the pressure you have, and that is why the hole has to be full of grease.

I have managed to pull bearings frozen in rusty old flywheels this way.
I had to read this a couple times before I figured out what the hell you were talking about but once I got it, that's kind of brilliant.
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Old 10-22-2014, 07:20 PM   #11
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Amazing what going to school does for you, innit?
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Old 10-22-2014, 07:28 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bertrandsv87 View Post
All these ideas are OFF....... A lot of manufacturers use CA glue to fit their bearings inside the backplate, so you will need to soak the whole plate in Acetone first, and then heat the plate up to take out the bearing... It should come out easily with an Allen wrench... After the acetone, I also use some liquid wrench to further loosen the bearing. Avoid the methods that suggest destroying the bearing or hitting with a hammer!!! You don't want to bend anything.....
Only BERT KNOWS!!!LOL!!!!!! I've pulled many Novak Ballistic backplate bearings out that way...... One of them was so stuck that I had to repeat the process several times, and had to heat the black backplate until it turned brown to get the bearing out....
Another technique is to use bread instead of grease through the bearing inner race hole and cram it up in there real good with a tight shaft, but you'll still need to use acetone&heat first...
Lastly, you can use a can of freeze spray after the acetone&heat to freeze the bearing quickly while the case is still hot. The bearing should pop out...
Using bread you'll take a long time to compress it until it has no air in it.

If you read again my explanation you'll see the bearing is not hit with the hammer, but the pin (old motor shaft).

I would be more concerned of distorting things when heating/cooling.

Super glue is not a worry, but not a bad idea to give it a soak. Either way, it will not hold against hydraulic pressure. This method is used by Sykes Pikavant to pull industrial bearings bigger than your car off interference shafts (they have a clever device that attaches to the shaft and pumps oil inside). There are other bearing retaining gels more bastardly than super glue, those might be a worry, but I don't think our humble hobby instigates such over engineering.
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Old 10-23-2014, 01:31 AM   #13
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wouldn't it be easier to just buy a new endplate? All of the suggestions sound like a lot of work and u could tear it up anyway.
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Old 10-24-2014, 09:06 AM   #14
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Well so far the acetone to loosen the glue hasn't worked and the grease to hydraulically lift the bearing out didn't work. This timing plate is kicking my arse. I called Novak to get a new one and their customer service is closed on Friday. I guess no one needs help on Fridays.
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Old 10-24-2014, 10:37 AM   #15
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What happened when you tried the grease method?
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