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Old 05-04-2014, 09:53 PM   #946
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What diff seals are guys running to keep the diff from leaking. I heard someone locally tell me something about a yokomo seal. Is that correct? Can someone tells the right part number?

I've searched the thread and can't seem to find the info I'm looking for.

Reeeeevised. Thanks
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Old 05-04-2014, 10:06 PM   #947
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What diff seals are guys running to keep the diff from leaking. I heard someone locally tell me something about a yokomo seal. Is that correct? Can someone tells the right part number?

I've already tried the kyosho seals. And while they seal fine. They are to tight to the Outdrives. I know some of you will disagree. Try taking your diff apart. And try to lightly spin the outdrive and diff half. It will be slightly tight. So if you are trying to run 500-1000 weight oil in the diff. The seals make it feel like 2-3k is in it without any oil. Just because the seals are that tight on the Outdrives. Don't believe me? Compare a diff half with a kyosho seals. And a stock black seal. And see the difference.

A couple of us locally all switched to the kyosho seals. And couldn't figure out why our diffs felt so tight when we were all running the same oils we were before.

I've searched the thread and can't seem to find the info I'm looking for.
Have you tried these? http://www.tamiyausa.com/items/radio...-o-rings-42259
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Old 05-04-2014, 10:17 PM   #948
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Nick, it's the Tamiya red orings that we have been using that are too tight.
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Old 05-05-2014, 01:06 AM   #949
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Originally Posted by bagged69chevy View Post
What diff seals are guys running to keep the diff from leaking. I heard someone locally tell me something about a yokomo seal. Is that correct? Can someone tells the right part number?

I've searched the thread and can't seem to find the info I'm looking for.

Reeeeevised. Thanks
Here is a guide. Myself and the other Tamiya guys build our diffs like this and have no leaks. (Metal gears are essential for offroad 4wd)

http://www.thercracer.com/2013/07/ho...gear-diff.html

We have used the Kyosho o rings and the Tamiya ones (the red ones) and both seem fine.
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Old 05-05-2014, 01:34 AM   #950
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^ I followed your guide pretty much as well with the use of VG diff grease in lieu of green slime and the tamiya shims (0.3mm)

I also sanded the gears slightly - to 3.60mm and 4.55mm exactly.

The VG grease is very smooth with a quite distinct smell to it actually!

No leaks so far!

Word word of caution is the VG grease needs to be used with mineral oil only though.
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Old 05-05-2014, 01:37 AM   #951
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Here is a guide. Myself and the other Tamiya guys build our diffs like this and have no leaks. (Metal gears are essential for offroad 4wd)

http://www.thercracer.com/2013/07/ho...gear-diff.html

We have used the Kyosho o rings and the Tamiya ones (the red ones) and both seem fine.
I'll order some Kyosho P5's to try. The Tamiya reds don't leak but they are way too tight for running 500 CST. We have gone back to kit black ones but they leak pretty bad from the outdrives.
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Old 05-05-2014, 08:53 AM   #952
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My understanding is the Tamiya Red (orange to me) are just re-badge Kyosho ones...

Also curious, under what conditions do you see the need to run 500cst diff oil?
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:21 AM   #953
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My understanding is the Tamiya Red (orange to me) are just re-badge Kyosho ones...

Also curious, under what conditions do you see the need to run 500cst diff oil?
Bummer, if that's the case.

More off power steering.
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Old 05-05-2014, 01:26 PM   #954
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Originally Posted by dizope View Post
Nick, it's the Tamiya red orings that we have been using that are too tight.
Solution is to use thinner shims. Kit 0.3mm are too fat for the red rings, use some 0.1mm ones. Adjust until you are happy. Don't file anything down.

I don't usually spam my blog but my method is here - http://fiveeight0sixsix.wordpress.co...iff-a-la-dave/

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Old 05-05-2014, 03:03 PM   #955
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Solution is to use thinner shims. Kit 0.3mm are too fat for the red rings, use some 0.1mm ones. Adjust until you are happy. Don't file anything down.

I don't usually spam my blog but my method is here - http://fiveeight0sixsix.wordpress.co...iff-a-la-dave/
Not exactly... while the .3 shims make it extra tight with the pin in, the real issue is the inner diameter of the red oring. Try it for yourself, assemble a diff half with a red oring and an outdrive. Hold the outdrive in one hand then try to spin the diff half. Notice the friction. Now take a kit (black) oring and do the same thing. You will notice that the black oring is much freer. Orings were lubed with green slime and shock/diff oil for testing.

In my current diff, I'm using black orings with (1) .3 on one side and (2) .1 shims on the other side because a .3 was too tight.

PS: The credit goes to Nick for discovering this. I blindly built mine with the Tamiya red orings and just accepted the tightness. I also started with 2k oil so it wasn't as bad but now that I'm running 500, the outdrives need to freer, in my opinion.
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Old 05-05-2014, 06:23 PM   #956
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More off power steering.
That's very low, never heard of anyone using that low cst in a diff before in any make of car (but it maybe needed where you're racing, lol). Is this for carpet or asphalt, what motor class?
If I may, I would suggest you stick with the orange o ring (Kyosho or new Tamiya o-rings, no more leaks) and try getting more off-power steering some other way. Have you thought about adding some anti-dive, reducing your camber, or shorten your rear wheel base...
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:56 PM   #957
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Originally Posted by dizope View Post
Not exactly... while the .3 shims make it extra tight with the pin in, the real issue is the inner diameter of the red oring. Try it for yourself, assemble a diff half with a red oring and an outdrive. Hold the outdrive in one hand then try to spin the diff half. Notice the friction. Now take a kit (black) oring and do the same thing. You will notice that the black oring is much freer. Orings were lubed with green slime and shock/diff oil for testing.

In my current diff, I'm using black orings with (1) .3 on one side and (2) .1 shims on the other side because a .3 was too tight.

PS: The credit goes to Nick for discovering this. I blindly built mine with the Tamiya red orings and just accepted the tightness. I also started with 2k oil so it wasn't as bad but now that I'm running 500, the outdrives need to freer, in my opinion.
Try the Kyosho ones. I've been using those since the gear diff came out and they don't bind at all. Also, if you're leaking from the diff gasket, I found that the rounded side needs to face in. Call me crazy, but since I started doing that no more leaks.
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Old 05-06-2014, 03:44 AM   #958
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I have no problems with my diff. I have the steel gears and the oil from Kyosho (1000). Did the diff built exactly according to the instructions together and not a drop is lost.
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:57 AM   #959
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Being the grumpy old man I am, I thought Tamiya diffs were too last year (and quite agricultural too), so I machined 1mm off shoulders on either side of an Xray diff and replaced the Tamiya item. This requires Xray belts and driveshafts, but saves 15grams for each end of the car.

Nice.

Then I had another idea and changed the Xray diffs to the Corally SGX diffs (same weight as Xray) I had lying around which means I could use Tamiya driveshafts on the rear (with 46 or 48 mm dogbones) and the 46mm on the front (I changed those too in fact to Yokomo 40.6 items simply because they're nicer). Belts remain the Xray items 305431 front (507mm/169 teeth) and 305444 (183mm/61 teeth) rear.

Didn't manage to figure out how to use silicone oil in these without it leaking all over the place (Corally use a "syrup" so dense it would take the rest of eternity to fill the diffs) so I used silicone grease, nice and sticky.

There you have it.

Internal ratio changes of course, so you can use smaller pinions to boot. Corally actually make a 37 tooth pulley for the SGX diff just to piss off Tamiya, but I didn't see the point.

Next job is to change the servo holder which I find too chunky to an Xray carbon plate (T4) which happens to have the holes exactly at the correct distance to fit in the Tamiya chassis and some Corally posts (F1) and inner TA05 servo holder. The Corally posts will need some machining again, but boy do they look sleek.
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Old 05-06-2014, 09:16 AM   #960
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Being the grumpy old man I am, I thought Tamiya diffs were too last year (and quite agricultural too), so I machined 1mm off shoulders on either side of an Xray diff and replaced the Tamiya item. This requires Xray belts and driveshafts, but saves 15grams for each end of the car.

Nice.

Then I had another idea and changed the Xray diffs to the Corally SGX diffs (same weight as Xray) I had lying around which means I could use Tamiya driveshafts on the rear (with 46 or 48 mm dogbones) and the 46mm on the front (I changed those too in fact to Yokomo 40.6 items simply because they're nicer). Belts remain the Xray items 305431 front (507mm/169 teeth) and 305444 (183mm/61 teeth) rear.

Didn't manage to figure out how to use silicone oil in these without it leaking all over the place (Corally use a "syrup" so dense it would take the rest of eternity to fill the diffs) so I used silicone grease, nice and sticky.

There you have it.

Internal ratio changes of course, so you can use smaller pinions to boot. Corally actually make a 37 tooth pulley for the SGX diff just to piss off Tamiya, but I didn't see the point.

Next job is to change the servo holder which I find too chunky to an Xray carbon plate (T4) which happens to have the holes exactly at the correct distance to fit in the Tamiya chassis and some Corally posts (F1) and inner TA05 servo holder. The Corally posts will need some machining again, but boy do they look sleek.
Tamiya makes a servo mount like what your looking for on their off-road 503x
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