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Old 11-01-2016, 03:02 AM   #1171
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So slippers were made for ball diff protection? And not traction control? I always thought it was to reduce wheel spin from too much torque.
As with any device, it serves any function you find it useful for.

I use the slipper clutch for traction control, and depending on the vehicle, also backflip control. (that doesn't apply to the XV-01 specifically, though.) I have never installed one on a vehicle and wished I hadn't; I've never had one fail and I don't notice the extra rotating mass.
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Old 11-03-2016, 12:18 AM   #1172
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Do you know if the rear stablizer bar of the trf418 or ta06 would also fit?

The trf stablizer kit has a much better way of adjusting sways than the xv-01 or TA cars. You can actually just use a hex to adjust it rather then taking the ball link off and un/screwing to adjust the height. To make it even.


Oh yeah btw, TA short revesable suspension came in the mail today. Xv-01 TC modifications coming shortly. Omg, I can adjust front shock angle now!





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Electric On-Road is pretty active, and the XV-01 is kind of a niche product, so...

That's a nice looking body. Who makes it?

For the XV-01TC, you can use the XV-01 front swaybar and the TA-05 rear swaybar with a small amount cut off the ends.
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Old 11-03-2016, 08:46 AM   #1173
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Originally Posted by 4roller View Post
Do you know if the rear stablizer bar of the trf418 or ta06 would also fit?

The trf stablizer kit has a much better way of adjusting sways than the xv-01 or TA cars. You can actually just use a hex to adjust it rather then taking the ball link off and un/screwing to adjust the height. To make it even.


Oh yeah btw, TA short revesable suspension came in the mail today. Xv-01 TC modifications coming shortly. Omg, I can adjust front shock angle now!
I am adsuming you mean the sway bar linkage.. Yes they should work. The actual bars are too wide for stock XV arms, but would work with XV01 TC version.
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Old 11-03-2016, 11:51 AM   #1174
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Originally Posted by fyrstormer View Post
As with any device, it serves any function you find it useful for.

I use the slipper clutch for traction control, and depending on the vehicle, also backflip control. (that doesn't apply to the XV-01 specifically, though.) I have never installed one on a vehicle and wished I hadn't; I've never had one fail and I don't notice the extra rotating mass.
The slipper clutch is so you don't destroy your driveline. Saves you from stripping out gears and snapping drive shafts. You should be adjusting your traction with diff. fluid viscosity but whatever works for you.
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Old 11-03-2016, 08:33 PM   #1175
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It's a machine; any adjustment that works and doesn't cause other problems is a good adjustment. There are no rules to consider, only results.

You can't adjust the maximum torque sent to the wheels by changing the diff fluid. If you're trying to avoid wheelspin while driving on surfaces with widely varying traction, and you're already running a low-power motor and high-traction tires, the slipper clutch is the perfect spot to dissipate excess torque. Works like a charm, especially on my FWD XV-01.
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:08 PM   #1176
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For the reason you just stated, every person running on carpet which has super high traction should have a slipper clutch. In fact those who run mod with 4.5 motors would most likely nuke their entire drive line frequently due to the power being transmitted and the amount of grip that's available.

Wheel spin releases energy, where as grip places stress on various parts of the transmission.

Yet none of them run a slipper clutch, nor do they run even metal gears in their diffs. Instead they tune for traction with various differential fluids.

My advice along with a few others is that it's not a necessary. It's just an added cost.

If it works for you then it works for you.
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:14 PM   #1177
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Originally Posted by Raman View Post
For the reason you just stated, every person running on carpet which has super high traction should have a slipper clutch. In fact those who run mod with 4.5 motors would most likely nuke their entire drive line frequently due to the power being transmitted and the amount of grip that's available.

Wheel spin releases energy, where as grip places stress on various parts of the transmission.

Yet none of them run a slipper clutch, nor do they run even metal gears in their diffs. Instead they tune for traction with various differential fluids.

My advice along with a few others is that it's not a necessary. It's just an added cost.

If it works for you then it works for you.
Diff fluids are used to tune for cornering characteristics, not straight line traction.
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:28 PM   #1178
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Great, ordered!

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I am adsuming you mean the sway bar linkage.. Yes they should work. The actual bars are too wide for stock XV arms, but would work with XV01 TC version.
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Old 11-03-2016, 11:43 PM   #1179
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Default xv-01 TC conversion

The revesable suspension arms came in the mail yesterday. I had ordered them from Buyee (middle man bidding site) from Japan. They help you bid on items from Japanese shopping/auction sites, consolidate packages and shipping, and sent it to you in North America. Total cost for all the parts was around $80. $20 of which are fees and shipping. About $20-30 less than I calculated buying it all new from overseas retailers (those that had inventory)

The parts are:
Full front and rear arms, 44mm CVDs, uprights, bearings, turn buckles, pins, kingpins, ball end and, suspension blocks. The only thing I had to buy local was 46mm suspension pins. All parts are carbon reinforced.

Below are the mock up of front and rear.



To achieve the same amount of ride height, and not be completely stuck with TC height
I had to do two things.

1. Shave down the chassis to get steering to not bind at max height.

2. Shave down the front suspension arm about 2-3mm. The front arms actually limit the travel at the uprights.




Above you can see, two things. On the left, with suspension arms shaved a little, and long shock ends. I can get about 18mm of ride height. Close if not the same as stock (more later). On the right, the height with short shock ends, super low Touring Car status. ~6.5mm of ride height.

Below the chassis converted. The track with has increased quite a bit. From 177 to 184 up front. More in the rear.


So the nice thing about this set up is, when you use the long shock ends, you can actually get the full range of motion front the shock and when the shock is completely compressed, it actually goes above the bottom of the chassis. This is something the stock set up could do with short shock ends but not the long ones.





The long ends on stock give you super ride height, but basically stopped right at the base of the chassis when fully compressed. With the short ends you would get limited ride height but when the suspension fully compressed the wheels would be almost a 10mm above the chassis. A lot of wasted travel.

This modified (shaved) TC arms setup gives the best of both worlds with the long shock ends. Maximum height and a little something above the chassis at full compression.


Another thing you get is more laydown shocks angle on the front (hard to see here.) The stock setup basically had vertical front dampers. With the TC setup, the suspension gets progressively stiffer the more it is compressed. The rear on the stock setup was pretty decent. It the damper doesn't hit the gear cover anymore!



One other thing is now I can modify the rear roll center much more effectively. The parts I got came with 2-3mm upright spacers to lift the ball end at the carrier. This makes for some major camber gain (longer top camber links) which help a lot with rolling and traction.

The suspension is definitely more active, the arms are longer, giving them more leverage and roll is more evident too. This lets you really see and feel the difference when making spring choices. The softest stock springs felt even more squishy than stock. I love it!

Below, long ends sitting around 12mm with x-patterns mounted. There is a lot of available up and down travel as at 12mm is sitting at about 40% sag.



Below with short ends you can get 5mm ride height. Sag at 20%. Super TC low-low chassis scrapping action. You can basically get the car all the way down to 0mm and have upward travel of about 10mm.




The two issues I've found so far are, the rear sway from the xv-01 doesn't fit. It's too short. Secondly, very annoying, the stock 5.5mm wheel hexes are too short for HPI and Tamiya 26mm rims that have deep spokes. They rub on the ends of the hub carriers. I fixed this by using 7mm hexes, but will be ordering 6mm hexes to see if that will work, and give me a safe amount of thread to lock my wheels on.

So far I am pleased with the TC setup, I think with the shaved front arms, and the chassis cut a little, this would have made a great rally and TC car. I can't wait to take it full blast.

Last edited by 4roller; 11-04-2016 at 01:11 AM.
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Old 11-04-2016, 08:08 AM   #1180
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Diff fluids are used to tune for cornering characteristics, not straight line traction.

The purpose of the fluids is to replicate a limited slip differential. The higher the CST the more the slip is limited.

You are right that their affect becomes more noticeable in a corner. But even in straight line acceleration, you need to adjust the steering, which changes the rotation speed of the inner wheel versus outer wheel. So differential movement is not completely inactive during straight line acceleration. Power is not always transmitted to each wheel perfectly, because there is the left and right balance, as well as left and right traction.
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Old 11-04-2016, 09:30 PM   #1181
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Originally Posted by Raman View Post
For the reason you just stated, every person running on carpet which has super high traction should have a slipper clutch. In fact those who run mod with 4.5 motors would most likely nuke their entire drive line frequently due to the power being transmitted and the amount of grip that's available.

Wheel spin releases energy, where as grip places stress on various parts of the transmission.

Yet none of them run a slipper clutch, nor do they run even metal gears in their diffs. Instead they tune for traction with various differential fluids.

My advice along with a few others is that it's not a necessary. It's just an added cost.

If it works for you then it works for you.
Well, if they run on carpet they're almost certainly racing, and slipper clutches are banned in touring-car racing.

I'm thinking about it from the perspective of my FWD rally car. It has a spool to maximize power delivery if one wheel loses traction, since it only has two powered wheels to work with. Even with a 27t silver-can motor it can spin those two wheels easily. So I have a slipper clutch tuned to allow only a tiny amount of wheelspin on dry pavement, where I can reach the highest speeds and thus need the most reliable traction. Without the slipper clutch I could see the entire vehicle vibrating as the front tires chittered on the pavement when accelerating. On dirt, there's going to be lots of traction-loss anyway, so it's less of an issue there.
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Old 11-04-2016, 09:39 PM   #1182
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Well, if they run on carpet they're almost certainly racing, and slipper clutches are banned in touring-car racing.

I'm thinking about it from the perspective of my FWD rally car. It has a spool to maximize power delivery if one wheel loses traction, since it only has two powered wheels to work with. Even with a 27t silver-can motor it can spin those two wheels easily. So I have a slipper clutch tuned to allow only a tiny amount of wheelspin on dry pavement, where I can reach the highest speeds and thus need the most reliable traction. Without the slipper clutch I could see the entire vehicle vibrating as the front tires chittered on the pavement when accelerating. On dirt, there's going to be lots of traction-loss anyway, so it's less of an issue there.
You'll probably get better overall performance if you ditch the clutch and learn better throttle control. If the slipper is set that loose, you're likely losing power in parts where you don't need to.
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Old 11-04-2016, 11:45 PM   #1183
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Default Body mount stiffener

I made a simple body mount stiffener from bicycle derailleur cable. It doesn't work for compression, but is fantasticly stiff when it is being pulled apart. It makes a big difference when the body gets pulled from side to side on turns. It's also a couple of grams of weight in the rear, albeit high 😂

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Old 11-05-2016, 02:06 PM   #1184
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Default XV-01 TC suspension

So I was playing around with the TC suspension.

I really like it. There is much more in the way of setup that one can do. Like I mentioned before, for the most flexibility I am using long damper ends with TRF dampers. I found that with the settings I started with, I was riding kind of high at 12mm. Great for rally.

I moved the damper mount ball ends further outwards on the front and rear. This changed the cars handling quite a bit. It made the suspension feel a bit stiffer and also lowered the car to where its now sitting at a comfortable 7.5-8mm. Perfect for TC/Street driving.

Since I am waiting for the rear sway/stabilizer bars to ship. I am finding without any sways in the rear, the car really turns into a point and go kind of car. The rear end swings out to whichever way you point the car. On a hard controlled turn you can see the rear inner wheel lift and expand when throttle is applied. If the car oversteers, it is very predicable. With a body on, the car leans really deep in the rear.

I find that if you go down to less than 5mm ride height, the car just acts like a crazy carpet. Not very controllable, sliding, spinning and skidding out. At 18mm+ the car can easily flip with a body on. At 6-12mm the car won't roll over, and your level of oversteer progressively increases the lower you go due to less available chassis roll.

Thats all for now
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Old 11-05-2016, 03:10 PM   #1185
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I am using long damper ends with TRF dampers. I found that with the settings I started with, I was riding kind of high at 12mm. Great for rally.
Ehm :-). The recommendation for our races is 25-28, 20 is the lowest acceptable ride height (track is mixture of gravel, dirt, grass). ;-)

Personally I think 25 is little too high, so I'm staying at 20, and it seems to work OK so far.

I'm in process of switching dampers from Gmade (no good selection of springs) to Team Associated 12mm Big Bore v2 dampers. The selection of springs is great, and one can also use springs from other manufactures. As I need really soft ones, Team Durango soft springs is what I've got.

I've built the dampers today (one set of 75mm, and one 85mm for future use), and as far as I can tell, they are as good as TRF (I have 55mm + longer rods, which gives me 61mm). I'm really happy, because my rear end is finally not limping (I had either too soft or too hard springs).

If anyone is interested:
- Shock Shaft 21mm + Shock Body 23mm + 1 spacer gives 75mm
- Shock Shaft 27.5mm + Shock Body 27.5mm + 3 spacers gives 85mm
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