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Old 09-01-2016, 08:03 PM   #931
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4Roller, to get down to FDR of 3.7 or so, you would need to switch to 64pitch gears. My last set up sheet for the XV01 I was running a 82T / 48T 64 Pitch gear.

These are 64 pitch I use

Spur

http://www.tqrcracing.com/shop/produ....asp?p_id=9312

Pinion

http://www.tqrcracing.com/shop/produ....asp?p_id=7773

To my knowledge, there are no 64 pitch gears designed for slippers.. so you would need to use the solid hub with these gears.
Why would you need to change pitch to drop the FDR?
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Old 09-01-2016, 09:14 PM   #932
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Why would you need to change pitch to drop the FDR?
You don't need the change the pitch to goto a lower FDR.

However if you want to get to to a 3.6 FDR (racing) and have it fit under the dust cover, then this pitch change is nessesary. 48P gearing is just too large.

I will probably stick with 48P since I can get to 4.93 which is plenty fast.
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Old 09-01-2016, 10:15 PM   #933
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Since the 64p has finer teeth, you get more teeth for the same diameter gear. Example: a 72 spur (48p) = 96 spur (64p) in diameter / size.

The disadvantage of 64 pitch is that it's harder to mesh and teeth damage more easily from debris. If you have a gear cover like XV01, you're fine.
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Old 09-03-2016, 12:54 AM   #934
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Default Battery position and steering

As if it wasn't obvious enough. The battery, being the single heaviest piece in the car, can greatly effect the weight distribution traction, and steering.

I finally figured out why my car was steering way more one way than the other. It was the battery. I flipped it 4 different ways before finding out which way works best.

Now my car can spin out both ways, one side is still slightly more biased, but it's pretty close now.

Coupled with some the steering mods, suspension preload, and the battery position in the car (I think) it is behaving as it should.

I wouldn't think that flipping the battery bottom to top would make such a big difference. Now the label faces down, it's pushed back as far as possible, with the esc's battery cables running along the center line, and the deans connection with the rest of the wires scrunched up in the front.

I shall confirm tomorrow whislt smashing streets, and tires.

That is all. This car is still awesome.

Oh yeah, I ordered a 72T and 38T spur/pinion. We'll see how that goes.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:45 AM   #935
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Oversteer Guide

I recently have been noticing on exitng a turn, with power on, the rear end spin out more than desired. This is why I've been pretty obsessed lately with equal steering. I thought that the link would be useful for anyone trying to diagnose any issues with oversteer.

Also, I went and rebuilt my rear diff, opting to try thicker fluid in the rear, bad idea. I had a mix of 900cst and 65k cst fluid 4:1 ratio. And even though the rear diff is still free spinning, that little bit of extra bite applied to the rear drive wheels (on power exit) can greatly change the driving dynamic, for the worse. If too much power is applied to that inner rear wheel, traction is lost and ends up spinning out. This might be okay with off-road situations, but on road, tire spin means less control.
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Old 09-03-2016, 05:06 PM   #936
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Stiff front swaybar and thick front diff fluid.

It's not the inside wheel that's causing the axle to skid, it's the outside wheel. Thicker diff oil means more power gets sent to the wheel with more traction, thus causing it to break loose too, and then because both wheels have lost traction the whole axle slides sideways.
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Old 09-03-2016, 06:14 PM   #937
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Stiff front swaybar and thick front diff fluid.

It's not the inside wheel that's causing the axle to skid, it's the outside wheel. Thicker diff oil means more power gets sent to the wheel with more traction, thus causing it to break loose too, and then because both wheels have lost traction the whole axle slides sideways.
You are correct fyrstormer.

I was thinking, when the rear end gets power, the inner and outer wheel are getting more together. As soon as the weighted (outer) wheel slips, game over.

I rebuilt the diff with 900cst (tamiya) and 500cst (40wt Associated) in a 8:1 ratio. This way its a little lighter than before. It works better. But will probably spin out of the diff from centrifugal force in a matter of a week. Whatever. The lighter that rear diff, the better.


Top Speed:
I can confirm with 77/32 spur/pinion, 5 degrees motor timing and 24 degrees of turbo, with larger (66mm) wheels. I can hit 42MPH on a flat. I downloaded a GPS speedometer app, and strapped my phone to my car. I think if I had more runway it would be faster. No body shell though. I am not sure if the car is more or less aerodynamic with the shell on or off.

Anyway, with 72/38, it will be mega nuts, and with more base timing, it will be ultra nuts.

Last edited by 4roller; 09-04-2016 at 01:32 AM.
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Old 09-03-2016, 06:22 PM   #938
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I haven't had trouble with my diffs leaking.
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Old 09-03-2016, 08:14 PM   #939
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I haven't had trouble with my diffs leaking.
Is it because you have the ta06 aluminium diff plate?

I was reading the rc crawlers threads from years back, and it seems like the thinner fluid seems to leak out after a while. My front 65k cst is still thick and doesn't seem to be leaking.
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Old 09-03-2016, 08:22 PM   #940
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Default Drive it till the tires fail




I drove my car today with the 66mm O.D. Cheapy tires. I love it. Shredded them till they basically fell off the rim. One of the foams even went missing.

The car handled pretty well right up until they started splitting, and at that time you could hear the rubber flapping which kind of sounded like a Gundam and it's machine guns.




Here is an image of the tires after I pulled them off the rims. When gluing, I started only using a drop around each spoke, on the very outer edge of the bead. It makes for much simpler removal of rubber. I just need to clean up the rims with a razor and sand paper, and I should be able to mount new tires.

Last edited by 4roller; 09-04-2016 at 01:33 AM.
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Old 09-03-2016, 08:35 PM   #941
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Is it because you have the ta06 aluminium diff plate?

I was reading the rc crawlers threads from years back, and it seems like the thinner fluid seems to leak out after a while. My front 65k cst is still thick and doesn't seem to be leaking.
It's the O-rings that cause the leak with thinner oils. If you change to the Kyosho p5 orange O-ring it will solve the leak issue.
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Old 09-03-2016, 09:04 PM   #942
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Is it because you have the ta06 aluminium diff plate?

I was reading the rc crawlers threads from years back, and it seems like the thinner fluid seems to leak out after a while. My front 65k cst is still thick and doesn't seem to be leaking.
I ran a couple of them for most of a year with the original plastic diff plates. Still no leaks, though I'm sure the aluminum ones produce a slightly more consistent seal since they don't flex perceptibly.

I don't know anything about the Kyosho O-rings Raman mentioned, but I do know Tamiya's TRF orange silicone O-rings work well. Probably the same product with different labels.

It's nice to see you getting so much enjoyment out of your XV-01. It means mine should hold up similarly well as time goes on.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:25 PM   #943
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It's the O-rings that cause the leak with thinner oils. If you change to the Kyosho p5 orange O-ring it will solve the leak issue.
Thanks, I bought some TRF blue competition silicone o-rings. From a user on here.

I just rebuilt my shocks yesterday. So it will be a month before I pull them apart again. I replaced the 2 hole pistons with 3 holes, and using 40wt (500cst) in them. They seem to handle the springs better. Not over damped.

I am still using the original o rings, but I tired to see how the TRF dampers would handle more o-rings. You can fit exactly 2 o-rings stacked, and then the bottom white spacer and end cap. No other spacers will fit.

So double blue silicone seals in the TRF dampers and clear silicone seals in the diffs the next time I do I big rebuild.
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Old 09-04-2016, 09:03 AM   #944
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The old way to build the trf dampers was with 2 o-rings, which is what i recommend if you are running on dirt. For indoor you only need one o ring. You can mix and match the o-rings to your liking as well.. put the softest in first eg clear and then orange.. avoid the tamiya blue o-ring its very soft and best for carpet.

The reason I recommended the Kyosho o-ring over the tamiya.. is that while they are both orange, the kyosho one is slightly more meaty and seals better...

This hobby can be a little over the top and even the old o-ring has given rise to a company that specializes in just that lol! These guys claim that their black version are better than anyone else!

http://www.team-axon.com/products/oring/oring.html
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Old 09-05-2016, 11:49 AM   #945
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The old way to build the trf dampers was with 2 o-rings, which is what i recommend if you are running on dirt. For indoor you only need one o ring. You can mix and match the o-rings to your liking as well.. put the softest in first eg clear and then orange.. avoid the tamiya blue o-ring its very soft and best for carpet.

The reason I recommended the Kyosho o-ring over the tamiya.. is that while they are both orange, the kyosho one is slightly more meaty and seals better...

This hobby can be a little over the top and even the old o-ring has given rise to a company that specializes in just that lol! These guys claim that their black version are better than anyone else!

http://www.team-axon.com/products/oring/oring.html
I'll keep that in mind about the blue orings being soft.

I remember back in the day there were 2types of o rings. Black, hard. Orange soft. I had the orange ones in my Associated RC10 dampers. Any little abrasiveness that so much as glaced those orange orings, they would tear and you have silicone oil all over you suspension mounts after a run.

Now there are so many durometer hardnesses for orings I can't keep track. Anyway, I run on the street and not really any dirt. So I think the blue orings should be fine, I'll maybe mix two different types just in case.

Last edited by 4roller; 09-05-2016 at 12:10 PM.
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