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Old 12-12-2003, 06:24 PM   #7171
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Default drive train questions

I run stock class. I just installed the IRS pincushion composite dogbones to lighten things up a little. Also, I was running metal outdrives (extremely heavy) and switched to the standard plastic (kit) ones. I am also running the aluminum front and rear layshafts. What are your thoughts on this setup for stock class?

Issues:

The plastic outdrives seem more difficult to adjust than the metal ones were. Should this be the case?

The IRS composite dogbones run the rear shocks. I will need to make spacer to move the shock slightly more rearward. About 3/32" should do it. Has anyone else ran into this?

The round end on the short shaft was a tight fit inside the radii on the end of the dogbones. The don't move as free as I think they should. Again, has anyone run into this issue?

Also, on AE website I see that the list composite outdrives. They are part number 3908's as opposed to the plastic kit ones which are 3912's. Any idea what these are or any experience with them?

That's it for now, thanks,
John
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Old 12-12-2003, 06:25 PM   #7172
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Default Re: drive train questions

Quote:
Originally posted by jcrouse
The IRS composite dogbones run the rear shocks. I will need to make spacer to move the shock slightly more rearward. About 3/32" should do it. Has anyone else ran into this?
I mean they RUB the spring on the rear shocks.

Duh,
John
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Old 12-12-2003, 06:44 PM   #7173
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I just put the IRS composite CVD bones and the Associated composite outdrives and I have no rubbing at all. I have had the rear at short and medium wheelbase and still no rubbing.
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Old 12-12-2003, 06:59 PM   #7174
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Quote:
Originally posted by wyd
I just put the IRS composite CVD bones and the Associated composite outdrives and I have no rubbing at all. I have had the rear at short and medium wheelbase and still no rubbing.
I take it that the composite outdrives from AE are made of the same material as the IRS dogbones? Does that seem to be the case? My dogbones seem much tougher that the stock AE (plastic) outdrives. Also, how was the fit of your short shafts in the radii inside the dogbones. Mine seemed like it could have used anothe .015 clearance or so.
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Old 12-12-2003, 07:12 PM   #7175
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Default Re: drive train questions

Quote:
Originally posted by jcrouse
I run stock class. I just installed the IRS pincushion composite dogbones to lighten things up a little. Also, I was running metal outdrives (extremely heavy) and switched to the standard plastic (kit) ones. I am also running the aluminum front and rear layshafts. What are your thoughts on this setup for stock class?

Issues:

The plastic outdrives seem more difficult to adjust than the metal ones were. Should this be the case?

The IRS composite dogbones run the rear shocks. I will need to make spacer to move the shock slightly more rearward. About 3/32" should do it. Has anyone else ran into this?

The round end on the short shaft was a tight fit inside the radii on the end of the dogbones. The don't move as free as I think they should. Again, has anyone run into this issue?

Also, on AE website I see that the list composite outdrives. They are part number 3908's as opposed to the plastic kit ones which are 3912's. Any idea what these are or any experience with them?

That's it for now, thanks,
John
My bad.....I notice upon further reasearch at Tower Hobbies that what I called the composite outdrive is in fact the plastic ones (part number 3908) and what I referred to as the kit ones (part number 3912) is in fact the metal ones.
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Old 12-12-2003, 07:13 PM   #7176
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I think the outdrives are made of more of plastic and the IRS seem to have the graphite/composite type finish. I noticed the outdrives are like my Yokes and were plastic.

My axles seem ok but they are close to rubbing the rear hubcarriers where they run through the bearing. The Composite bones are a little fatter all the way around .
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Old 12-12-2003, 09:06 PM   #7177
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J Crouse: Check and be sure that the upper shock mount/bushing is giving you the correct angle. You want to get your shock 90* from the angle of your suspension arm, or as close as possible. This usually moves the upper shock out far enough for your dogbones to clear the shock spring/spring retainer.

The lightweight outdrives from AE are a non composite plastic, much like YOKOMO outdrives, as previously mentioned. They will be easier to adjust and use if you be sure and use a teflon based lube on the bushings inside them. Make sure they are lubed inside the bushing where they ride on the outdrive, and on the outside of the bushing, where they fit inside the opposing outdrive. A teflon based lube will not break down the lube on the differential balls, whereas oil would. This lube can also help the diff resist meltdowns when running modified. Most teflon lube resists very high temperatures, and has good adhesive properties. I know you said you run stock... but i figured this could be useful info in the future.
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Old 12-15-2003, 08:58 AM   #7178
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Default Servo Saver

Hi all

Is anyone running a servo saver in addition to the steering rack one? I was thinking of using a saver on the servo itself but have heard there may not be enough clearance.

Let me know

Thanks
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Old 12-15-2003, 09:07 AM   #7179
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i have never seen a TC3 with any other type of servo saver.


you really shouldn't need one....i'm not sure if you are racing and bashing....but in general you should be fine with the way the TC3 steering is set-up.


if you did try and install one...i think you are right in that clearence would be an issue.
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Old 12-15-2003, 09:22 AM   #7180
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I have already broken 4 servo's with the stock servo saver. Yes, the saver is setup properly but I tend to hit the walls and WHAM the gears break. I have upgraded to a MG servo so that should eliminate the problem but I was just looking to be safe with a 2nd saver on the servo.

Thanks
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Old 12-15-2003, 10:55 AM   #7181
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rinkrat99.

if you were running the base plastic gear servos....those strip/break very easily.

now that you are running a metal gear servo you shouldn't have it happen at all. one of the best and lower priced MG servos you can guy is the JR Racing Z590....it's usually about $40.00 and has great torque/speed ratings.
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Old 12-15-2003, 11:10 AM   #7182
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Hey Nexus

I bought a Hitec 525MG which was $35 and comparable to the JR servo.

Have you had any clearance problems when using the RPM ballcups? I had to widdle the two for the rear wheels when the wheel was rubbing.

Also, just under the steering rack, it might hit once in a while.
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Old 12-15-2003, 12:55 PM   #7183
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Default cleartance

i had the same problem.
isolved it by shaving the corner off the ones that rub the rear wheels and by cutting out a groove in the X stuff under the steering rack. it is only a little bit of work, and solves the problem.

Dremel
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Old 12-15-2003, 02:55 PM   #7184
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Default Servo Saver/Servo

Rinkrat99:

Cheap servos = stripped gears

The Hitec 625 servo will give you a decent amount of torque/speed - 93oz and .13sec speed to be precise. For the money, this represents good value. I have used these in the past and had no problems. Same for 615 and 645. I have heard people slag these servos off, but I've never had problems with them.

You wont break a 645 in a TC3 and you wont need an additional servo saver. Put it this way, if you do, you'll have mangled your TC3 first!!

As your racing improves, you should consider upgrading to a Hitec 5925 digital servo. It has 128oz of torque and .08 speed!!! What the figures don't tell you though is the power and precision around neutral - it's awesome. For the money, nothing comes close! I use these for steering on 1/8th buggies (5945 for throttle/brakes), 1/10th off road and touring cars (currently in my Yok SD). My TC3 is currently on the shelf awaiting a makeover

I hope this helps.
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Old 12-15-2003, 04:40 PM   #7185
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Hi horatio

I heard that the Hitec 625mg had some problems with Neutral positioning and tyhe 525 was the way to go.
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