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Old 04-25-2003, 04:20 PM   #4891
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Perhaps we're looking at it backwards -

if it gives the shock more travel, wouldn't it give a better overall shock action? smoother action? something along those lines?

just an idea
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Old 04-25-2003, 04:29 PM   #4892
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Leaning the shocks in means the shocks compress less given the same amount of suspension travel. That allows the shocks to compress more quickly giving an effect of a softer suspension. I would think if your shocks were built correctly, smoothness of shock movement would be the same and that the shocks would actually be more consistent because they have to work less.
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Old 04-25-2003, 05:46 PM   #4893
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Quote:
Originally posted by Axiom5B
...So i put the shocks up one whole (outer hole) and i go out there for my heat. Amazingly, I had all the steering I wanted
Dont get me wrong, I dont doubt that you gained steering. I am just after why that is. Its just that my brain says it shouldnt happen, but obviously it did, so i need to fix the way my brain thinks

As for the compressing more and rolling more, I think dotmans post clears that up a lil bit. If i get some ambition I might do a lil math and see what the numbers say about shock angles. (yea i am a dork like that)
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Old 04-25-2003, 06:06 PM   #4894
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I got this from the Warpspeed thread (thanks Mr. Warpspeed). You might find this very helpful and save you some time doing calculations


http://home.tiscali.be/be067749/58/
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Old 04-25-2003, 06:21 PM   #4895
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by DOTMAN
[B]I got this from the Warpspeed thread (thanks Mr. Warpspeed). You might find this very helpful and save you some time doing calculations

No problem Dotman. I already have private message to
Cracker 78 before you had posted this. Glad I could help.
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Old 04-25-2003, 08:25 PM   #4896
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cracker78
Ok, I absolutely agree with you, but just for the sake of argument lets say we have two setups, one with shocks "stood up" and one with shocks "layed down." Now if we put stiffer springs on the "layed down" setup such that the energy required to compress both setups would be the same. Would there be a difference in handling?
YES, there is a difference in the two shock setups you just listed. It gets complicated... but I'll give it by best shot. Stiffer springs have a higher spring rate (or spring constant). It is refered to as "k." "k" is a rated value that can be in terms of pounds per inch... or simply, how much weight is required to compress a spring some given length. The load on a spring is equal to the spring constant times the amount of compression, X. (Load = -k * X)

As Dotman stated before:
"Leaning the shocks in means the shocks compress less given the same amount of suspension travel."

If you match the correct 'stiffer' spring (higher k) with the 'layed down' shock (lower X) the result will be the same response to using a 'softer' spring (lower k) and 'stood up' shock (higher X). This proves that the handeling difference does not result from the spring change.

The difference in the two setups you listed is in shock dampening. By laying down the shock, it compresses less. With less shock movement, there is less resistence from the damping. Less damping will cause the car to react quicker and possibly be less stable.
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Old 04-25-2003, 11:42 PM   #4897
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uhm I dont get it!!!
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Old 04-26-2003, 05:14 AM   #4898
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GAME---- Just stand the shocks up, put the stiffest springs and oil you can find on it and wheel the MOFO!!!!!
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Old 04-26-2003, 07:53 AM   #4899
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I kept on melting my outdrives and been spending too much on replacement plastic outdrives. I need help on how to do the assembly and adjustments correctly. I've been hearing alot of ways but I guess it is best to hear it from your guys in the TC3 thread. Thanks in advance
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Old 04-26-2003, 07:55 AM   #4900
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Default Spur Gear

Just a question to the TC3 guru's out there.

What will be the difference in performance if I use a bigger spur gear (75) than 72t?

example:
75 spur / 26 pinion= 7.21
72 spur / 25 pinion = 7.20

I both end up with the same ratio but will there be a difference in performance since the spur is bigger? (acceleration??)

I run on stock, and the tracks is big, flowing with some tight turns?

Thanks for the inputs!!!

Lem
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Old 04-26-2003, 08:19 AM   #4901
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I'll try that this weekend with the reflex then...
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Old 04-26-2003, 09:14 AM   #4902
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fatboy joe,

bring your tc3 on saturday at the tracks. let me have a look at it.
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Old 04-26-2003, 10:11 AM   #4903
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Default Re: Spur Gear

Quote:
Originally posted by lem2
Just a question to the TC3 guru's out there.

What will be the difference in performance if I use a bigger spur gear (75) than 72t?

example:
75 spur / 26 pinion= 7.21
72 spur / 25 pinion = 7.20

I both end up with the same ratio but will there be a difference in performance since the spur is bigger? (acceleration??)

I run on stock, and the tracks is big, flowing with some tight turns?

Thanks for the inputs!!!

Lem

For stock you want a bigger spur. Bigger spur translates into more torque. A smaller spur would make the drivetrain spool up faster though. I ran my tc3 w/ a 100 tooth (64 pitch, equivalent to 75 tooth) and liked it. Your best bet is to just try both and use the one you like better.
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Old 04-26-2003, 11:28 AM   #4904
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If the spur/pinion ratio is the same, a bigger spur is no different from a smaller spur. What changes is the weight location of the motor. The weight change is more noticible on a 1/12th scale since you are moving the motor's location fore or aft in the motor pod and 1/12th scales are a lot lighter.

To use full-size cars as an example, for tranny gearing they talk about the ratio - they don't talk about the individual gear sizes because all they really care about is the ratio.

-Rich
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Old 04-26-2003, 03:07 PM   #4905
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Default Re: Cracker78

Quote:
Originally posted by Mike D
YES, there is a difference in the two shock setups you just listed. It gets complicated... but I'll give it by best shot. Stiffer springs have a higher spring rate (or spring constant). It is refered to as "k." "k" is a rated value that can be in terms of pounds per inch... or simply, how much weight is required to compress a spring some given length. The load on a spring is equal to the spring constant times the amount of compression, X. (Load = -k * X)

As Dotman stated before:
"Leaning the shocks in means the shocks compress less given the same amount of suspension travel."

If you match the correct 'stiffer' spring (higher k) with the 'layed down' shock (lower X) the result will be the same response to using a 'softer' spring (lower k) and 'stood up' shock (higher X). This proves that the handeling difference does not result from the spring change.

The difference in the two setups you listed is in shock dampening. By laying down the shock, it compresses less. With less shock movement, there is less resistence from the damping. Less damping will cause the car to react quicker and possibly be less stable.

my $.02 worth on the shock angle...
with the shock standing up, there is more constant force on the wheels, therefore it will have more bite, this would account for the fact that you'd feel more steering...

with the shock layed down, the shock feels softer, as discussed earlier; however, it will get progressively harder as it moves up... in my opinion, with the same spring rate, this adds to the initial roll of the car, therby adding steering...

i think shock angle, is at most a tuning device to suit different driving style's... a step up or step down, would just add to the style one drives his car or to suit the track conditions...

Last edited by highwayman; 04-26-2003 at 03:17 PM.
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