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Old 08-24-2010, 07:24 PM   #3196
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Thanks for the response!! I have been flying RC helis for years but I am a real noob when it comes to RC cars and especially pan cars so I appreciate the help. I don't know anything about tuning these cars so I just keep guessing/changing things to see if it helps or makes it worse.

I have the stock foams, the standard rubber tires and the option rubber tires (soft rear, hard front) for the car. The stock rear foams and standard rubber wheels are horrible in our parking lot. The soft rubber tires seem to hold the rear the best. The foams up front seem to give me a bit more steering but the hard rubbers work just as good when it is hot outside.

I had a hard time getting it to steer tight around corners which is why I switched to the other camber setting. With this setting and a little toe out, the car seemed to corner a little quicker. I have the high traction T-bar on order from Hong Kong... hopefully it will get here in the next few weeks.

If I set the diff up really loose, the rear end holds awesome and the car drives better than ever for a couple laps but the diff works itself loose pretty quick. If I set it up tight enough that it won't loosen up, the rear end kicks out more and more. I was thinking about trying the ceramic diff balls but I didn't know if that would make any difference or just be a waste of money. Are there any tricks I can try for a really smooth low friction diff that won't work itself loose?

The car is over-powered too which doesn't help I am thinking about replacing the current setup with a CC Sidewinder 4600. I run a Mamba Max Pro/5700 in one of my touring cars and I really like the adjustabillity of the ESC and smooth power output.
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Old 08-24-2010, 07:28 PM   #3197
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Sorry about the long posts

I just got the front spring sets from Tamiya today in the mail. I busted the front end a few weeks ago and lost one of the springs. I had all of the parts to fix the car except the spring so I cut down a spring from a bic pen for my front suspension Our parking lot is not the best, should I go with a harder spring or something soft to help with the rough surface?
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Old 08-24-2010, 08:06 PM   #3198
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For me the kit/med. front rubber tires and the soft option rear has been the best combination.
I still think soft suspension in the rear and firm up front for bumpy and loose surfaces.

The parking lots are gonna be a crap shoot without some sort of traction goo sprayed.
Seriously, kickdown a couple $ and get a few liters of orange soda, I hear it's the best, poke a hole in the cap and spray it liberally in the corners but save plenty for the straights too cuz that will also get hairy.

No race tracks for you to go to? The prepped surface will make your day.

Kinda like when a guy buys a crotch rocket and tries to race it on the street.
Ends with a trip to the hospital or worse.
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Old 08-24-2010, 10:18 PM   #3199
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F N CUDA View Post
For me the kit/med. front rubber tires and the soft option rear has been the best combination.
I still think soft suspension in the rear and firm up front for bumpy and loose surfaces.

The parking lots are gonna be a crap shoot without some sort of traction goo sprayed.
Seriously, kickdown a couple $ and get a few liters of orange soda, I hear it's the best, poke a hole in the cap and spray it liberally in the corners but save plenty for the straights too cuz that will also get hairy.

No race tracks for you to go to? The prepped surface will make your day.

Kinda like when a guy buys a crotch rocket and tries to race it on the street.
Ends with a trip to the hospital or worse.
CUDA what setup do you recommend for carpet? I just got my F104 as well and almost ready for my first run.
Looks like the track will require rubber tires.
I have a HT T-bar installed,#400 shock oil, 1 deg. of camber, 0 deg. toe. ect.
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Old 08-24-2010, 11:41 PM   #3200
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I gotta tell ya, I'm not an authority on RC cars and setups although I do race em a lot and I have a clue what is working for me now and then.

As far as the 104 on carpet, I have run mine a few times but only on rubber cuz when it comes to running foams, I have an F103 with foams that I know will easily destroy my 104. So never wasted a set of foams on my 104.

When I did run my 104, the rubber that worked for me was the same combo I use for asphalt.
Soft rears and medium/kit fronts. Keep em clean, always.
Also, earlier in this thread it is suggested to break in new rubber tires on the asphalt before going to the carpet.

I firmed up the rear suspension to let it turn instead of pushing too bad but it always lacked a little steering. Didn't put much more effort into it, went back to the 103 and went fast again.
Don't really like the F104 on carpet but didn't try foams.

Don't really like the F103 on rubber either. Can't hang with foam and the rubber available is mediocre at best.

Kinda only still running the F104 cuz that is the only F1 class at the Tamiya Nationals this year, on rubber, and I live near that track and have a lot of fun there.

I hope they know they really need to bring the F103 back to the Tamiya Championship Series cuz as far as F1 goes, the F103 on foams can't be touched by the new F104 but that wasn't their intention anyway.

Making a modern F1 chassis kit was their goal and they nailed it.

There are 2 different chassis classes for Tamiya F1s now although the Ultimate F1 Series that we run here in So Cal runs them all (not just Tamiya) together and we score them separately, not by chassis but by tire choice.
Rubber or foam.
Foam rules for F1 RC.
On asphalt or carpet.
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Old 08-25-2010, 01:33 PM   #3201
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F N CUDA View Post
I gotta tell ya, I'm not an authority on RC cars and setups although I do race em a lot and I have a clue what is working for me now and then.

As far as the 104 on carpet, I have run mine a few times but only on rubber cuz when it comes to running foams, I have an F103 with foams that I know will easily destroy my 104. So never wasted a set of foams on my 104.

When I did run my 104, the rubber that worked for me was the same combo I use for asphalt.
Soft rears and medium/kit fronts. Keep em clean, always.
Also, earlier in this thread it is suggested to break in new rubber tires on the asphalt before going to the carpet.

I firmed up the rear suspension to let it turn instead of pushing too bad but it always lacked a little steering. Didn't put much more effort into it, went back to the 103 and went fast again.
Don't really like the F104 on carpet but didn't try foams.

Don't really like the F103 on rubber either. Can't hang with foam and the rubber available is mediocre at best.

Kinda only still running the F104 cuz that is the only F1 class at the Tamiya Nationals this year, on rubber, and I live near that track and have a lot of fun there.

I hope they know they really need to bring the F103 back to the Tamiya Championship Series cuz as far as F1 goes, the F103 on foams can't be touched by the new F104 but that wasn't their intention anyway.

Making a modern F1 chassis kit was their goal and they nailed it.

There are 2 different chassis classes for Tamiya F1s now although the Ultimate F1 Series that we run here in So Cal runs them all (not just Tamiya) together and we score them separately, not by chassis but by tire choice.
Rubber or foam.
Foam rules for F1 RC.
On asphalt or carpet.
Cool, thnx for the tips.
Yea it looks like the track will be running two separate F1 races based on tire choice. I much prefer to run the foams too, everyone says they are way better.
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Old 08-26-2010, 03:29 PM   #3202
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What ride height is most popular for rubber tires? Which insert for the back and how many/which spacers should be used on the front suspension? Is anyone running the front a little lower than the rear? I tried lowering it one spacer in the front yesterday and it seemed to help steer into corners a little quicker... although it was pretty hot yesterday so the tires were extra sticky too. Any thoughts on ride height?

Is it better to run the diff pretty loose or should it be somewhat tight? Any tips for getting it super smooth?
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Old 08-26-2010, 06:43 PM   #3203
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I think the common rear ride height setting is axle all the way up, chassis low with rubber tires.
A bunch of us get away with the stock inserts, some are playing with them too.

I've moved my ride height in the front up and down and settled on one large under and the med. and small shim on top of the spindles.
Happy medium.
When I add more steering into corners it usually adds steering all over and I have trouble coming out of corners, too loose, so I like it to push overall a little bit and deal with the push entering corners with a little bit of braking when absolutely necessary.
I run a little toe out, for me it seems to help turn in and push out of corners a tiny bit better.

As far as diffs, me and several others agree, NEVER let the diff slip like a clutch to gain traction.
It can't be locked either.
Build it fresh, put it down, hold both wheels and quickly punch it.
When it barks, snug it a touch at a time til it is just barely tighter than the slipping point. It'll still be butter smooth at that point (fresh parts remember?)
Done deal, if it never slips, it won't wear prematurely and will stay smooth for a long time.
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Old 08-26-2010, 08:49 PM   #3204
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F N CUDA View Post
I think the common rear ride height setting is axle all the way up, chassis low with rubber tires.
A bunch of us get away with the stock inserts, some are playing with them too.

I've moved my ride height in the front up and down and settled on one large under and the med. and small shim on top of the spindles.
Happy medium.
When I add more steering into corners it usually adds steering all over and I have trouble coming out of corners, too loose, so I like it to push overall a little bit and deal with the push entering corners with a little bit of braking when absolutely necessary.
I run a little toe out, for me it seems to help turn in and push out of corners a tiny bit better.

As far as diffs, me and several others agree, NEVER let the diff slip like a clutch to gain traction.
It can't be locked either.
Build it fresh, put it down, hold both wheels and quickly punch it.
When it barks, snug it a touch at a time til it is just barely tighter than the slipping point. It'll still be butter smooth at that point (fresh parts remember?)
Done deal, if it never slips, it won't wear prematurely and will stay smooth for a long time.
CUDA when you say "quickly punch it", you mean the the trigger right?
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Old 08-26-2010, 09:05 PM   #3205
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Yep, just enough to see if the diff slips.

Many guys like to test the diff on the surface they are racing on but again, if you are flyin around and find out that the diff has been slippin, it's gonna feel like crap right away.

Grab both wheels, punch it and snug it up til it doesn't slip.
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Old 08-26-2010, 09:13 PM   #3206
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Is it just me, or are the front kit rims wider than the sponge tires that are supposed to accompany them?
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Old 08-26-2010, 09:22 PM   #3207
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Thanks for the advice F N Cuda!! I'll rebuild the diff again and see if I can get it working a little better. I got the high traction T-bar and a few other parts today so Ill do a good rebuild before the next run. Are you running the rear height at the lowest setting or stock?

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Is it just me, or are the front kit rims wider than the sponge tires that are supposed to accompany them?
I think its normal, mine aren't as wide as the rims either
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Old 08-26-2010, 09:28 PM   #3208
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Thanks for the advice F N Cuda!! I'll rebuild the diff again and see if I can get it working a little better. I got the high traction T-bar and a few other parts today so Ill do a good rebuild before the next run. Are you running the rear height at the lowest setting or stock?



I think its normal, mine aren't as wide as the rims either

OK cool thanks. Mine look exactly like yours. I wonder if that's a manufacturing issue.
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Old 08-26-2010, 11:52 PM   #3209
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I'm driving the F60 Ferrari kit, came with rubber tires and the ride height adjusters have the axle at the top, so that would be the lowest ride height when measuring between the chassis and the ground.

Now go punish that thing!
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Old 08-26-2010, 11:58 PM   #3210
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Quote:
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Is it just me, or are the front kit rims wider than the sponge tires that are supposed to accompany them?
the rims are wider so it can fit aftermarket tires which are wide. Its normal
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