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Old 03-30-2011, 08:31 AM   #14791
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My preference is 1 o-ring under the piston and no urethane on top of the bladder. It seems to make the too much rebound for my taste. I like my shocks with very little rebound. I build them that way for carpet or asphalt.
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Hi Guys,
Quick question on shocks (re: M-05):
On the M-Chassis TRF shocks (Tamiya part #54000), do you guys use the black o-ring spacer under the piston on the shaft (seems to overly limit the travel) , and do you use the urethane bushing above the diaphragm (not even sure what it's purpose is)?
Thanks in advance (-:
SoCal
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Old 03-30-2011, 10:30 AM   #14792
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Hi,

always had an understanding problem with rebound, but know Iīm totally confused on how talking about it:

Putting a foam on the diaphragm will cause an higher pressure on the oil when the damper is compressed, so the piston rod comes out (because of the piston rod volume has compressed the diaphragm and the foam), so this is for me a push out force on the piston rod. (as gas force on a real damper)
Building a shock with "rebound" is to close it with e.g. fully compressed length during closing process. As result the shock sucks the piston rod in, which is a rebound force, isnīt it?

So leaving out the foam will cause little more "rebound" as with a foam, as long as closing the shock in the same condition.

In my last TEC race I saw the M03 winner building his shocks with fully pressed in piston rod and without foam, as I would see it "full rebound"...

Thatīs just how I understand it, but do you guys here see it the other way round? To compare setups, itīs important to speak the same language...

So letīs discuss, Iīve still a lot to learn about setups!

BR,
Matthias
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Old 03-30-2011, 10:41 AM   #14793
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Hi,

always had an understanding problem with rebound, but know Iīm totally confused on how talking about it:

Putting a foam on the diaphragm will cause an higher pressure on the oil when the damper is compressed, so the piston rod comes out (because of the piston rod volume has compressed the diaphragm and the foam), so this is for me a push out force on the piston rod. (as gas force on a real damper)
Building a shock with "rebound" is to close it with e.g. fully compressed length during closing process. As result the shock sucks the piston rod in, which is a rebound force, isnīt it?

So leaving out the foam will cause little more "rebound" as with a foam, as long as closing the shock in the same condition.

In my last TEC race I saw the M03 winner building his shocks with fully pressed in piston rod and without foam, as I would see it "full rebound"...

Thatīs just how I understand it, but do you guys here see it the other way round? To compare setups, itīs important to speak the same language...

So letīs discuss, Iīve still a lot to learn about setups!

BR,
Matthias
"Rebound" is the extension stroke of the shock. In English, you might call the compression stroke "bound".

Personally I never build the Tamiya shocks with the foam wedge as I feel it gives an artificially strong rebound. And I never build a shock that sucks the shaft back in. I'm not saying it's right, it's just what I do.
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Old 03-30-2011, 12:48 PM   #14794
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Has anyone tried the new Ride low-profile 60mm M-chassis tyres yet?

Low profile tyres (60mm outer/47mm inner diameter).

'Inch up' 47mm wheels (25006/25007, half way down page).
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Old 03-30-2011, 03:07 PM   #14795
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Matthias,

Quote:
In my last TEC race I saw the M03 winner building his shocks with fully pressed in piston rod and without foam, as I would see it "full rebound"...
I think you will find this will give no rebound in the shock. If you only want a small amount of rebound then use a spacer around the shock shaft which is removable and will give you four shocks built the same. This way you can get 20, 50 etc rebound.

I always build my shocks with zero rebound and nothing above the diaphragm/bladder in the shock.

This works for me. It all comes back to how you like your car to handle and your driving style.

Toon,

I have used the Ride tyres and they are what was used in TITC this year. The tyres are available in four compounds. Two front and two rear. I have only tried the 38 and 36 compounds and have found they work best in the warmer weather. The packets I recieved had the tyre, insert and rim included.

Later,

Calvin.

Last edited by caltek1; 03-31-2011 at 12:43 AM.
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:59 PM   #14796
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Thanks Guys,
Appreciate the info. With the o-ring on the shaft, and with the shock fully extended, the a-arms are just barely level w/ the ground. Would that be correct??? Sorry for such basic questions; just looking for a good starting point (-:
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Old 03-30-2011, 11:19 PM   #14797
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Thanks digit RC and Calvin,

so its just a misleading in the talk. It would be more correct to call the "rebound" Bump or compression, as itīs in a real shock.
Maybe iīts from Basketball, and if you push the piston rod in and it comes back out itīs a rebound.

So in fact, Calvin bulds his shock exactly like the guy I watched.

All the years I built Tamya shocks, I did it always like described in the kit, but obviously I have to play a bit more with "rebound".

Funny thing is, that everybody does it, but nobody really can explain the effect in the car...

Thanks so far from Germany,
Matthias
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Old 03-31-2011, 01:19 AM   #14798
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that sucks
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...I think that's the best way to keep it fun and affordable (where's that thread about reviving on-road?
over here mini class is considered entry level. Its more considered to be for new racers to start off at the minimum possible cost & complication
ie: more or less 'racing straight out of the box'
Because the cost is so small & 100% fuss free without any hopups, other racers have started running mini as a 2nd car .
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Old 03-31-2011, 01:42 AM   #14799
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We have been running them for a while but are still finding that the Ride 3035 and the Ride 60D's were working better.

They do work very well on very high grip tracks though as they were the control tyre for TITC 2011
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Old 03-31-2011, 02:50 PM   #14800
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Hi All,

First time caller etc.

I've just bought a Tamiya M03M (Fiat 500) which is my first RC car. And I'm stuck already and not very impressed with Tamiya!

Well the first stage is to assemble the diff and screw the cover down with three self-tappers. And there's only two of the required size included in the kit. Not impressed. Am I right in thinking that I will have to provide that missing third screw or risk crud getting into the diff casing?

Second stage has stumped me completely. It's this one (which my newbie state neither allows me to include as an inline image nor link to - sorry!)

h ttp://i403.photobucket.com/albums/pp113/CoopdevilUK/stumped.jpg

MA12 just does not fit into the gears. At all. Is the instructions implying that it needs to be rammed in with sheer brute force? I just cannot see how the bearing will go in there without breaking the gear.

Can anybody help? This is the first RC car I've ever attempted and the first two steps in the instruction manual have just been complete disasters.

Coop
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Old 03-31-2011, 03:36 PM   #14801
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[QUOTE=Coopdevil;8893710]
Well the first stage is to assemble the diff and screw the cover down with three self-tappers. And there's only two of the required size included in the kit. Not impressed. Am I right in thinking that I will have to provide that missing third screw or risk crud getting into the diff casing?

You probably should put something in there. If you can't find a similar self tapping screw, an M3 machine screw will work just as well.

Quote:
MA12 just does not fit into the gears. At all. Is the instructions implying that it needs to be rammed in with sheer brute force? I just cannot see how the bearing will go in there without breaking the gear.
I've never heard of anyone having trouble with that bearing. They usually fall right into the gear. It should drop into the outer edge of the gear and then get recessed into it about 4mm. Maybe some careful examination for casting flash or an edge that's our of whack might be an idea.

Keep us updated and we'll try to set you right.
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Old 03-31-2011, 03:46 PM   #14802
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You probably should put something in there. If you can't find a similar self tapping screw, an M3 machine screw will work just as well.
I've found an identical screw in my slotcar collection so that's resolved cheers.

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I've never heard of anyone having trouble with that bearing. They usually fall right into the gear. It should drop into the outer edge of the gear and then get recessed into it about 4mm. Maybe some careful examination for casting flash or an edge that's our of whack might be an idea.

Keep us updated and we'll try to set you right.
I've just realised what I've done - been confused by Tamiya's destructions which make the MA12 850 bearing look like the 1150 Sealed Ball Bearing . Discovered this by searching ebay on the spare part code and thinking "hang on, that's a different colour and looks...err.. just like these two in the box."

Told you I was a newbie.

In my defense, the instructions do illustrate the bearing with four concentric circles which does make it look like a ballrace!

Coop
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Old 03-31-2011, 04:01 PM   #14803
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Very glad to have helped. Now ditch those bushings and put some real (ballraced) bearings in there!
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Old 03-31-2011, 06:00 PM   #14804
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Coopdevil, Tamiya has some of the best instructions around and those for the M03 are outstanding. Since this is your first R/C car, you've lucked out cause this one of the easiest of all to assemble. Rule #1 is that if something doesn't fit, before questioning the instructions, make sure you have the right part and you are not attempting to assemble it incorrectly. A big aid for a total newbie are the drawings of all the parts at the back of the manual.

I'd suggest going step by step exactly as spelled out. Another good thing to do is to layout all the parts called for in that step before starting to put things together. Much less confusing that way.

A universal problem for most newbies is stripping screws. On some of the parts, the plastic is soft so be careful not to overtighten. If you do, an easy fix is to use a toothpick to spread a thin coat of cyano in the screw hole, let it dry completely, then reinstall the screw. don't flood the hole with cyano or you'll have a big problem. Another way to do it is to use a 3mm machine screw of the right length after using the cyano.

Hope this helps. Good luck
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Old 03-31-2011, 10:16 PM   #14805
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Quote:
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I've just bought a Tamiya M03M (Fiat 500) which is my first RC car. And I'm stuck already and not very impressed with Tamiya!
Good thing you didn't buy an M06
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