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Old 09-24-2013, 05:29 PM   #1
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Default i have a silly question maybe someone can help me with.

i have serval rc cars and all the screws on most of them are allen screws except for 2 older cars i have thats mostly phillips screws well i guess i dont know my own strenth and i keep stripping all the allen screws on my cars so is there any new cars/trucks buggys anything that has phillp screws and not allen screws holding them together??
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Old 09-24-2013, 05:42 PM   #2
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Best advice I know of is to invest in quality tools. I started stripping Allen heads a lot a while back and then finally decided to buy some MIP Thorp wrenches. Best move I ever made. They are the best hex wrenches I have ever owned, and I have not stripped a screw since. You will pay around $11-13 per wrench, but they are worth every penny. They come in metric and standard. Seriously, don't underestimate the difference a top quality tool can make. The MIP wrenches are American made, and they will last forever.
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Old 09-24-2013, 05:45 PM   #3
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Good tools as mentioned, and have some spare screws on hand, replace them if in doubt. Make sure they are well cleaned out of dirt before trying to remove too.
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Old 09-24-2013, 05:57 PM   #4
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i have a hobbico set of allen wrenches not sure what i paid but yeah nothing fancy,il have to check into the ones you guys mentioned and get a good set and see if i have better luck..
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Old 09-24-2013, 06:06 PM   #5
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i have serval rc cars and all the screws on most of them are allen screws except for 2 older cars i have thats mostly phillips screws well i guess i dont know my own strenth and i keep stripping all the allen screws on my cars so is there any new cars/trucks buggys anything that has phillp screws and not allen screws holding them together??
well i live by the rule lose grip as ur clutch meaning let ur hand slide when the screws are snug, dont tighten them its plastic just snug them and use lock tight on the metal to metal ones. and just check them every couple runs or so to make sur they dont go lose on ya and ur good
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Old 09-24-2013, 06:13 PM   #6
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gotcha... yeah like my t4.2 i just replaced the steering servo this evening and it of course has allen screws holding it in and after installing the new servo the last two allen screws i put back when i went to tighten them both stripped so now if it breaks again i havent a clue how il get the servo out.
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Old 09-24-2013, 06:14 PM   #7
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well i live by the rule lose grip as ur clutch meaning let ur hand slide when the screws are snug, dont tighten them its plastic just snug them and use lock tight on the metal to metal ones. and just check them every couple runs or so to make sur they dont go lose on ya and ur good
That is the ticket. Don't torque plastic very hard. I also agree with the tools as well. Proper tools are a must if you enjoy this hobby. Especially if you run more than one vehicle.
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Old 09-24-2013, 06:31 PM   #8
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gotcha... yeah like my t4.2 i just replaced the steering servo this evening and it of course has allen screws holding it in and after installing the new servo the last two allen screws i put back when i went to tighten them both stripped so now if it breaks again i havent a clue how il get the servo out.
you can dremell a slot in the head and use a flathead to get it out.

when going into plastic i tighten until I feel a change in resistance, then back out 1/8 of a turn so the screw is not torqued all the way down.

depending on the tools you have, some if tips are rounding, you can file them down so it basically turns into a "new" tip.
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Old 09-24-2013, 07:38 PM   #9
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I built my first 2 kits(scte 2.0 and t4.2) with Alan keys...haha most annoying thing ever and yes stripped screws, just built my 3rd kit(tekno sct) with mip thorp drivers and the build was 2x as fast with nothing stripped
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Old 09-25-2013, 05:41 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by StadiumRC View Post
Best advice I know of is to invest in quality tools. I started stripping Allen heads a lot a while back and then finally decided to buy some MIP Thorp wrenches. Best move I ever made. They are the best hex wrenches I have ever owned, and I have not stripped a screw since. You will pay around $11-13 per wrench, but they are worth every penny. They come in metric and standard. Seriously, don't underestimate the difference a top quality tool can make. The MIP wrenches are American made, and they will last forever.
+1 on the tools, MIP is really good stuff, but there are many good options out there. They are worth the extra you have to pay over the cheap forged tools you get from the big chain stores. A precision machined tip will get a much better bite, and may even be able to grab what is left at the bottom of that "stripped" screw and remove it anyway.

Failing that, stripped screw extractors can be an option on all but the smallest of screws. You can find them online or in these chain stores. Your mileage will vary with them though. The dremel idea to put a slot in works well too, but will also tend to leave a small cut on either side of the screw in whatever part you are trying to remove. And once you get enough of the screw backed out to grab it with vice grips you have won the battle.
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Old 09-25-2013, 06:14 AM   #11
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The dremel idea to put a slot in works well too, but will also tend to leave a small cut on either side of the screw in whatever part you are trying to remove. And once you get enough of the screw backed out to grab it with vice grips you have won the battle.
that is a problem
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Old 09-25-2013, 06:25 AM   #12
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that is a problem
Really not much better than the old school method of drilling off the head of the screw and after you separate the parts you can use said vice grips to grab the threaded neck you hope to have left behind and be able to back the screw out for good.

Both are destructive to the finish of the part you plan to keep, and both work well enough, but are a last resort in my opinion... I would try to avoid that route if at all possible.

Step 1 is to get good hobby grade tools on hand and see if they have good bite on what is left of the screw. I have seen it work many times past and there is a lot of hope that will do the trick. A good LHS person would be a huge help on this, most service oriented shops have tools on the counter and will gladly help with this kind of thing.

I have had luck many times past by wiggling the two parts to back the threads out just a little allowing me to now use a tool that requires less torque to work. Once you get some play in there it takes a lot of mechanical stress off of things.
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Old 09-25-2013, 04:48 PM   #13
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No use in quality tools if you use a PZ1-tip on a PH2-head! Just had to point it out here. Be absolutely sure that you have the right tip on the screwdriver matching the head on the screwbefore using it. The first step to avoid stripping the head.
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