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Old 07-03-2011, 07:34 AM   #76
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Great job on your videos and the writeup! I'm going to be rebuilding my diff today or tomorrow most likely.

Question though: Why do you sand the b-fast rings? (or does this only apply to stock?) I thought the reason for their existence was that they were already finished for you, and slick and smooth already. I ordered the b-fast kit for my b4.1 FT and I'm hesitant to attack the rings with sandpaper.
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Old 07-03-2011, 10:12 AM   #77
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I have 50wt oil, but has anyone heard about Moo-Slick? I have heard nothing but good things about it, and I think it would be a better alternative, it basically sprays a thin layer of non-greasy silicone film that dries and becomes, hence the name, really slick. It works on anything, spraying suspension hinges, bearings, transmissions, squeeky doors, chairs, literally anything. It's worth a shot, they even sell a "corral" pack of Moo-Slick, Moo-ter Cleaner and Degreaser, and Cow Duster (way stronger than any canned duster you can buy at a market). But you have to buy at least 3 of one product at a time or get the all-in-one.

I am not trying to advertise their products, I'm letting people know of an alternative or even something possibly better than using 50wt. shock oil for lubricating the gears.
Also as a similar alternative is Dry Ice. Comes in a liquid and the carrier liquid evaporates off.

Have you had a chance to try out the Moo Slick?
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Old 07-03-2011, 10:20 AM   #78
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Also as a similar alternative is Dry Ice. Comes in a liquid and the carrier liquid evaporates off.

Have you had a chance to try out the Moo Slick?
I don't think the dry ice would provide any lubrication, and I have never heard anyone using it.

For anyone wanting to know if Moo-Slick is good, I don't even have to have it or even ask if it works, I know it just does. It will make the drive train buttery smooth, and will give you most likely a faster truck. Especially if you clean your bearings and spray them down with the stuff.

+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.


That's a review from a VERY trusted source. I will be purchasing this liquid miracle as soon as I have the extra money.
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Old 07-03-2011, 11:22 AM   #79
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Quote:
Great job on your videos and the writeup! I'm going to be rebuilding my diff today or tomorrow most likely.

Question though: Why do you sand the b-fast rings? (or does this only apply to stock?) I thought the reason for their existence was that they were already finished for you, and slick and smooth already. I ordered the b-fast kit for my b4.1 FT and I'm hesitant to attack the rings with sandpaper.
You'll get differant answers from almost everyone...I did it in the video to demonstrate the process more than anything...And I like to play it safe so I sand all my diff rings whether they be from b-fast or stock...

Thanks for the comment...
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Old 07-03-2011, 05:41 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvillecactus View Post
Question though: Why do you sand the b-fast rings? (or does this only apply to stock?) I thought the reason for their existence was that they were already finished for you, and slick and smooth already. I ordered the b-fast kit for my b4.1 FT and I'm hesitant to attack the rings with sandpaper.
You are correct. No need to sand the B-Fast rings unless you are trying to re-work some used ones (remove the groove). The surface finish that we apply to our rings after the flattening processes is on purpose.

Thanks for the order

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Old 07-03-2011, 08:26 PM   #81
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I don't think the dry ice would provide any lubrication, and I have never heard anyone using it.
http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/a...article_id=784

+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.


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That's a review from a VERY trusted source. I will be purchasing this liquid miracle as soon as I have the extra money.
Yeah, I've seen that and other reviews from "The Jang" before. I'm actually all for trying it one day. Only question is will it be with no rebuild kit, the standard kit, or the B-Fast kit....
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Old 07-10-2011, 04:49 PM   #82
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'DOH!

I thought you were literally talking about dry ice. I completely forgot about the lubrication "Dry Ice".

Sorry.
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Old 07-11-2011, 11:55 AM   #83
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Did I hear him say the ball ends are getting bound up and getting some "sticktion" in them?
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Old 07-15-2011, 06:41 AM   #84
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Better go BFast!
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Old 07-15-2011, 07:24 AM   #85
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Originally Posted by NLpurplelambo43 View Post
'DOH!

I thought you were literally talking about dry ice. I completely forgot about the lubrication "Dry Ice".

Sorry.
LOL - Now THAT is funny!
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Old 07-20-2011, 04:37 PM   #86
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Thanks for taking the time to do this write-up. Forget those people complaining about the sound, it is just fine. I have a Losi xxx-sct and most of what you said transfers over across the different manufacturers.

I do have one question though. What is the difference between using carbide, ceramic, or just regular chrome steel balls? Durability? Performance? Longevity? I'm new to electric and just wondering. Thanks in advance!
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Old 07-20-2011, 09:50 PM   #87
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Thumbs up Diff lube and tips

Great videos and information here! Remember, never use standard grease on your differential balls, make sure to use RC differential specific lube such as the one that came with your kit. And make sure to clean your differentials properly and often as a clean diff goes a long way in not only performance but also in prolonging the life of your differential parts.
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Old 07-21-2011, 02:15 PM   #88
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Quote:
Thanks for taking the time to do this write-up. Forget those people complaining about the sound, it is just fine. I have a Losi xxx-sct and most of what you said transfers over across the different manufacturers.

I do have one question though. What is the difference between using carbide, ceramic, or just regular chrome steel balls? Durability? Performance? Longevity? I'm new to electric and just wondering. Thanks in advance!
Thanks...

As to your question...Carbide is the preffered material for diff balls it offers great durability and hardness...Ceramic is just too hard to use in the diff, it can actually cause slipping because the balls are so hard...Stock balls tend to flatten out, or wear out too easily for most people's liking...

As for what material to use in the thrust bearing assembly, I would go with ceramic because in this instance you want the balls to be as hard as they can be, because it is acting as a bearing...

Good Luck
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Old 07-21-2011, 02:20 PM   #89
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Quote:
Great videos and information here! Remember, never use standard grease on your differential balls, make sure to use RC differential specific lube such as the one that came with your kit. And make sure to clean your differentials properly and often as a clean diff goes a long way in not only performance but also in prolonging the life of your differential parts.
Agreed...I prefer Associated's Diff Lube...But other manufactuers offer other choices...
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Old 08-07-2011, 08:07 PM   #90
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This is awesome. I'm installing the TLR kit on my SCB and the diff would have been a mess had I not found this. Thanks for taking the time to do this.
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